Nurses And Hospitals Resume Talks

nurse strike abbott northwestern12 Nurses And Hospitals Resume Talks

Meeting in a secret location, negotiators for 12,000 nurses and 14 Twin Cities hospitals are resuming talks today with help from a federal mediator. Today’s session comes three days after the nurses’ union voted to authorize a second strike — date to be determined.

A major issue is staffing levels; the union wants a nurse-to-patient ratio but the hospitals say that’s unacceptable.

  • crabbybear

    isnt it ironic that regions hospital has anounced a 3% raise each year for 3 years even though the economic times are a challenge as the hospital says — very obvious the hospital has said how they appriciate the nurses—-the abbott hospial ought to take notice of this

  • thenonconformer

    In Canada Nurses as well are clearly too often undeniably too mismanaged and pretentious services and pretentious management is generally the way things are still done: for the last few decades too now. While clearly the patients in Hospitals, nursing homes, tend to be sick often now still even seven days a week, 24 hours a day, the nursing staff clearly as a whole are not adequate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Now in a typical medical facilities there tends to be at least 3 types of classes of Nurses and related services being provided. The main day shift of Nurses tend to be the generally the one the best, offering the best, first class services. But even here there tends to be a mixture of both very high caliber workers and also some very bad ones too. The second shift of after noon and evening shift, services tend to be the one next composed of second class nurses, those who do generally themselves do offer a less substantial services. And next the late night and weekend nurses tend to be composed mostly of third class nurses, the undeniable worst, poorer Nurses, workers services being offered. The Nursing supervisors themselves tend to place the unwanted, the least desirable nurse for the late night and weekend shifts.
    California’s nursing disciplinary system is disgraceful. The state currently does not have a standardized method of monitoring suspensions or firings of registered nurses. The major nursing unions in California, opposed a bill for, primarily, a mandatory reporting clause that requires all employers to notify regulators about any Nurses firings for serious violations, such as gross negligence or physically harming a patient. California’s Board of Registered Nursing recently discovered that 3,500 registered nurses have been disciplined in other states.

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