Wolves Attacking Pets, Poultry In Minn.

By Steve Murphy, NewsRadio 830 WCCO

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota’s effort to restore the wolf population is working well — so well that the number of wolf attacks on domestic livestock and pets hit record levels last year.

In Minnesota, 15 dogs were killed by wolves in 2010 and there were more than 130 confirmed reports of wolves attacking livestock and poultry.

Wisconsin also saw an increase in wolf attacks.

Both states are seeking to remove the wolf from the federal endangered species list and restore state management of the population.

This morning, outdoor expert Ron Schara spoke with WCCO Radio’s Dave Lee about wolves, pets and livestock.

WCCO’s Dave Lee Interviews Ron Schara

  • stewart nickaboine

    go wolfs

    • Roadkill Stew

      If we get rid of the Wolfs, who will own the Vikings?

  • TheCrux OfTheBiscuit

    The problem with humans living amoungst apex predators is that eventualy they will start to eat us…..

    • Wolfman

      This is a huge problem. Next thing you know, we are going to hear about packs of wolves running into conveinence stores and stealing a bunch of stuff.

  • Bill

    Where are all the varmint hunters of Minnesota? “Have gun – Will travel!”

  • muy

    Reinstate the bounty on their pelts.

  • ideaman

    Whatever happened to Shoot, Shovel and shutup?

  • Tim

    Its too bad 15 dogs were killed by Wolves, but, still it is only 15. How many dogs are killed by cars and people. And when it comes to the livestock attacks, these fenced in cows and chickens are like a buffet to a fat man. There is no need to go out shooting wolves that may or may not eat someones chicken. It should be if a Farmer or someone sees a wolves attack their livestock or whatever, they can shoot if need be, but there is no need for a big hunting season for wolves Wolves are not a big problem. I think farmers and pet owners need to worry about disease and cars rather than wolves.

  • Dumb Hillbillies

    It is too bad about the dogs.. but here is a question, were these dogs properly supervised by a responsible dog owner or just left to roam by themselves? Secondly farmers get subsidised for the livestock loss.. so fail to see the issue with ranchers/farmers being up in arms about losing one or two in a heard. If its such a nusance maybe move out of wolf country in souther MN/WI?
    The fact of the matter is, these preditors were here to begin with, and the mentality of hillbillies and idots alike made it so that we had to reintroduce wolves, bison, and other animals in the first place. These apex preditors dont hunt humans, so quit being a pussy. If your not going to eat it, dont shoot it. As a NRA member and gun owner/hunter, Id rather shoot idiot humans shooting inocent animals before Id shoot wolves doing what they do… just shoot, dig, and shut up… right idea man?

    • Tou

      I myself is a NRA member and a gunower as well, and totally agree with you!

    • Roadkill Stew

      I hear grilled wolf tastes a lot like spotted owl.

      • Charlie

        I think it is a little more like Bald Eagle.

  • First Priority: A Healthy Ecosystem

    Dogs are popular and their numbers are increasing. It is hard to lose the family dog but anytime you let a dog run loose there are problems from poisoning, shootings, traps, cars etc… It maybe the family dogs that are killing the neighbors chickens and other farm animals; likewise it maybe the neighbors that are killing your dogs. Next, anytime you have livestock in the wilderness you will naturally have predators attacks especially if the preditors food sources are dwindling. Why is the food source dwindling?

    Seems to me people are getting desperate with this economy. Would hate to see them kill everything that moves in the forest; besides when forest animals are scarce people (predators) will be going for other people’s livestock and food supplies. I would rather protect the ecosystem in our forest than see the more dangerous predator (people) killing each other for food in desperate times.

    Where is proof anyways? Just because one person named Ron Schara says? Maybe he has a hidden agenda?

    • Huh!?!?


  • Greg Laden

    The question is: Are we crying wolf? Or not? … Just sayin’

  • Sheila

    Wolves are part of nature’s beauty and gift – we need to remember that we are encroaching on the wolves’ territory – not the other way around.

  • Beth J.

    What it boils down to is population control. If we let the population of any species get too high, they will be plagued with diseases and other problems. Also wolves can and are dragging down the population of other animals such as deer. It is a balance and hunting and trapping help to control the balance. The attacks are a sign that there is an imbalance and we do not listen to the initial warning signs nature is giving us it will get a lot worse!

  • Richard L.

    The rapidly increasing human population is destroying wildlife habitat. Humans are taking wildlife habitat to build large housing developments, shopping and industrial complexes, weekend getaway cabins, and farmland. Humans are encroaching on their territory – not the other way around. Wolves, deer and other animals are only trying to survive. It’s the increasing human population that needs to be controlled. The increasing human population not only means loss of wildlife habitat, it also means more unemployment, more disease, more people on welfare, more crime, more air and water pollution, and a more rapid depletion of the natural resources (oil, trees, ozone) that we need to survive. We need to stop the increase in the human population and we need a ban on any future development that encroaches on wildlife habitat, pollutes our air and water, and destroys farmland. The future of all living things depends on how we treat our environment. We need to live in harmony with the land not only in Minnesota but in the whole world. The truly great leaders of the world need to realize this and do what needs to be done.

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