Twin Cities Artist Turns Old Band-Aids Into Art

By Susie Jones, NewsRadio 830 WCCO

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Beth Barron is begging for Band-Aids. She will take just about any kind of Band-Aid, even ones with blood and dirt.

“I’m not picky. I’m mean, it’s sort of like, some are pretty intensely dirty. Usually I do find a lot on the ground,” she said.

NewsRadio 830 WCCO’s Susie Jones Reports

The idea of turning Band-Aids into art, came to her while walking around Lake Harriet. She noticed a Band-Aid and thought about how they made children feel better, even if there was no real injury, it always helped.

“And I wanted to stop crying and there was no Band-Aid,” she said.

She said it is all about healing for her, and pain.

“For me pain and resiliency are pretty serious business,” Barron said.

Barron carefully sews each Band-Aid onto a circle of cloth. She is creating seven mandalas, used for mediation. They will be displayed at an art show coming up in June.

More from Susie Jones
  • sam

    this is just gross

  • Trash not art

    A waste of band-aids, I cant understand why anyone would call this art!

  • flanders

    Possibly the dumbest thing I have ever seen. I’m no “artist” though.

  • Kenni

    This has to be just to get attention. Used band aides is not art, it’s disgusting.

  • StrongGirl

    This is so disgusting.

  • Duluth Broom Baller

    What is next? Using old toilet paper?

    • flanders

      That would make it “artsy fartsy’.

  • Duluth Broom Baller

    it would be just as ‘cr@ppy”

  • Mat Ollig

    Art of this kind requires you to understand about 150 years of art history. It is not for the un-educated. This piece touches a lot about how as a culture, we seek to find remedies that are quick fixes, (ie bandaids) and how they are never lasting; sometimes they solve the problem, sometimes its simply reactionary to quell fears and their use is entire superfluous. The act of giving a kid a bandaid is much like how we demand ever more security for the sake of feeling secure. Its the same thing.
    While Beth’s art may not be beautiful, it does raise a lot of questions, and at the very least it garners great response from people. So in that regard, the work is successful.

    • Beth Barron

      thank you Mat… very well put and I appreciate it. The work must be seen and actually it is quite beautiful. Delicate and fragile stitches. I hope you get to see it in person sometime and I truly appreciate your understanding. Beth Barron

      • Jen Morey

        Beth, how do we send you bandaids? Do you have a P.O. Box? (I wouldn’tt give your mailing address here, too many weirdos.) We ran the AP story in our paper in the Art section. I like what you had to say about the mandalas being a “meditation on healing” (or not healing as the case may be). I had the same surgery although not until age 50, but I had wanted it since age 16 too! Contact me through my website:

  • Florrie

    I think this work is just amazing. People can say this isn’t art but that is just ignorance. They don’t even know what art is. This art is inspiring and brings out so many emotions and truth about the world. I am so inspired and think this woman is BRILLIANT. What a strong woman you are. Not afraid of what people think at all and just want to express who you are. This takes a brave woman.

  • Lisa W.

    People…you need to think outside the box. A Bandaid is a medium just like acrylic paint, + seeds & beans in the MN State Fair art!! This is an amazing process if you have ever watched someone put a needle through a plastic, sticky object thousands of times to create an image very pleasing to the eye. Do not comment blindly on something that you’ve never experience up close & personal. That just shows a lot of ignorance & lack of emotion. Way to go Beth….keep up the amazing, inspiring work & my used bandaids go in the mail tomorrow!!

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