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Movie Blog MSPIFF Spotlight: ‘Cracks’

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Don't cross Miss G. (credit: IFC Films)

Don’t cross Miss G. (credit: IFC Films)

By Eric Henderson, WCCO

The atmosphere of scandal permeates nearly every frame of the polished but lurid Cracks.

Eva Green, better known as the unofficial “best Bond girl of all time” (or so the fansites would have you believe), makes not just one but at least a half-dozen campy entrances as Miss G, a vampy but approachable schoolmarm-ette who leads her squadron of boarding school protégés less like Miss Jean Brodie and more like Louise Brooks.

Miss G struts her stuff in designer scarves and chunky heels, occasionally donning a man’s hat if it suits her fancy. She’s like the cooler older sister who’s been around the world, just ran out of money and has returned home with an endless series of adventures to share.

When a genuine, exotic young aristocrat (princess?) is introduced into Miss G’s little brood, the hormonal balance and interpersonal allegiances swing every which way but loose.

Cracks is directed by Jordan Scott with only a slightly less heavy hand than that of her famed father, Ridley Scott (Gladiator, Alien). But the alternately prim and uninhibited environment keeps viewers perpetually edgy, not unlike its cinematic soul sister Notes on a Scandal.

If nothing else, it gives the saucy Green a chance to marinate in her own béchamel. (Theater 4; 9:45 p.m.)

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Other Highlights: Friday, April 15

2011 msp film festival logo Movie Blog MSPIFF Spotlight: Cracks

(credit: The Film Society of Minneapolis-St. Paul)

David Wants To Fly, in which David Lynch gets his transcendental meditation probed by German filmmaker David Sieveking. They say truth is stranger than fiction, but “they” probably haven’t seen Inland Empire. (Theater 5; 7 p.m.)

Kinshasa Symphony, a documentary approximation of that great scene in Love Me Tonight in which the sounds and rhythms of the street become music, Symphony sees urban tools and textures emerge as Beethoven. (Theater 3; 6:45 p.m.)

We Are What We Are, a moody, blank-faced horror movie about cannibals that also doubles as a metaphorical portrait of overground/underground Mexico City. Sign me up! (Theater 2; 10 p.m.)

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For the complete festival schedule, click here. An alphabetical listing of all the movies being shown can be found here. Ticket information is here.

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