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Movie Blog: Woody Allen Takes You To Paris In The ‘20s

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(credit: STF/AFP/Getty Images)

(credit: STF/AFP/Getty Images)

(credit: CBS) Jonathon Sharp
Jonathon Sharp is a web producer and blogger at WCCO.COM. He started...
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If you were fortunate enough to catch Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris, which both me and WCCO-TV’s Mark Rosen enjoyed, then you couldn’t help but notice the movie’s infatuation with the artists and writers of the 1920s.

The movie shoots you through them as though you were a spacecraft slinging from orbit to orbit. And if you liked any of those characters, which ranged from the macho matador Ernest Hemingway to the wide-eyed Spanish lunatic Salvador Dali, then you might want to check out the film series Woody Allen’s Paris In The ‘20s.

The series, presented by the Film Society of Minneapolis-St. Paul, showcases three films, all of which feature Paris and were made or inspired by prominent artists of that golden age.

Two of the films, it should be noted, bear the mark of Midwestern writers. One is the brilliant and impossibly sad The Sun Also Rises, based on Hemingway’s first novel. The other is Tender Is the Night, based on the novel by St. Paul-native F. Scot Fitzgerald. Both films were directed by Henry King, and they both follow the adventures, infatuations and devastations of young expats in Paris.

The third film in the series is something a little different. It’s Luis Bunuel’s The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie – a bizarre film about porcelain Parisians attempting to stage and finish a successful dinner party. It is very, very strange. That is, however, what one expects from someone who was close friends with Dali, the poet Lorca and others in the Surrealist group.

All the films are playing at theater 3 in the Anthony Main Theatre (115 SE Main Street, Minneapolis, MN 55414) from July 8 – July 14.

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