Police Need Help Finding Missing Woman

BROOKLYN PARK, Minn. (WCCO) – Brooklyn Park Police are looking for the public’s help in trying to find a missing adult who they said is vulnerable.

Virginia Elaine Glauber, 72 and known as “Ginger,” disappeared early Tuesday morning, police said. Authorities were called to a group home on the 6200 block of Yukon Avenue North to report her missing. Staff at the group home said she could have left any time between 1 a.m. and 7 a.m.

Glauber is described as 72 years old and a white female, about 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing around 125 pounds with short and very white hair.

Authorities said she wears her bangs long and combed to one side. She also walks very slowly to the point of shuffling. Staff at the group home said they didn’t know what she was wearing when the left the facility. Authorities also said they don’t suspect foul play at this time.

Staff members at the group home said Glauber is emotionally challenged and if spoken to, she may “look right through” you and not give any response.

Family members said they believe Glauber could have wandered from the home and onto an MTC bus. Anyone with information about her whereabouts is asked to call 911 or Brookly Park Police at (763) 493-8222.

  • What???

    How in the world could there have been a 6 hour gap of when she left??? That is INSANE. I want to run right out and put one of my family members in that facility. NOT!!

  • AF

    I’m sure there are some facilities that have great care takers… BUT then there are those that have employees that are there for the paycheck, not the patient/client. Regardless, UNACCEPTABLE!

  • Jenny

    I work in a group home, and some clients are not known for these types of behaviors… people always change, and things like this can happen as the clients age. It is by no means, at this point, the PCA’s fault. However, if the staff did not have sleep-hours and were supposed to be awake during this time to monitor this type of behavior, then it would be the fault of the PCA. Although there are some people who are there for just the paycheck, we can’t make assumptions based on the facts given. If you would work in a group home, you’d realize a lot more about them than what you can make assumptions on. Best of luck to the family and to the group home, and I will continue to hope for Ginger to have a safe return home.

  • Alfred

    Did they check the bingo halls and casinos?

  • Jeanne

    Jenny, you seem to understand this better than anyone. We cared for my father and mother in law for a year at home before it became unsafe to do so. We had caregivers to help us as well. My father in law had stroke related dementia and every day was a different day. What was “safe” one day, was not safe the next. One night, he was able to get out of the house (something he had NEVER done) and in the month of November, he was out in the car at 2 am in the morning. Had it not been that this particular caregiver was a light sleeper (or the month of January), it could have ended tragically. You cannot make assumptions is correct, Jenny. As for me, I am going to pray for the safe return of Ginger and that the caregivers do not guilt themselves either. It is a very tough job (rewarding, but tough).

  • j

    I’m her family member, and, Jeanne & Jenny, you are spot on. It is a wonderful small group home, with caring & attentive staff.

    Given the choice between that & a larger institution where she would be secure but essentially hospitalized, we are grateful to have her there.

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