Mike Max’s News And Notes For July 15, 2011

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The NFL lockout could be over by next week, Kim Kardashian is in town with former Gopher Kris Humphries and the Wild is evaluating talent this week.

It was all featured in this week’s News and Notes from Mike Max.

The Minnesota Vikings think their advantage to the lock out and no off season teamwork is on defense, where the team will be close to the same.

Vikings first round pick and quarterback Christian Ponder told WCCO-TV he will be back in town for good on Monday. He’s been working out with fellow rookie tight end Kyle Rudolph and Vikings tackle Steve Hutchinson.

The word from the Vikings right now is they are luke warm in Donovan McNabb. If the lockout is settled next week, they don’t expect to hold organized team activities, just training camp on July 31 either in Mankato or Eden Prairie.

Kim Kardashian’s reality television show will have a crew in town with fiance Kris Humphries this weekend.

Gophers’ men’s basketball forward Ralph Sampson has been training in Chicago with Michael Jordan’s former trainer. Former Braham star Noah Dahlman, who just graduated from Wofford, has signed a basketball contract overseas.

Look for former gopher assistant Jimmy Williams to have another appeal hearing on his lawsuit next week.

Wisconsin and Benilde-St. Margaret’s star Jordan Taylor was named one of the top five points guards in the country coming out of  an all-star summer camp.

Glen Perkins plan for the all-star break included time on the lake with Carl Pavano.

And a Devin Setoguci t-shirt is on sale for $27, but if you want the same Martin Havlat t-shirt it’s $10. The Wild will hold a scrimmage Saturday at Xcel Energy Center to cap their week of developmental camp.

More from Mike Max
  • zee the reporter

    Speed: 74-88 mph.

    The Masters: Bert Blyleven, Mike Mussina, Barry Zito.

    The Lowdown: There’s an absolute consensus in baseball that former 22-year major league veteran Bert Blyleven had the best curveball ever.

    “You can teach anyone to throw it,” Blyleven said. “I don’t know what made mine better other than the proper mechanics. The key is to get your fingers above the ball.”

    The curveball is less about grip and more about arm motion. The pitcher needs to get his fingers above the ball and then sharply snap his wrist and elbow down as he is letting go of the pitch. That creates a heavy topspin that forces the ball down.

    Blyleven’s curve, though, appeared to go up, then down.

    “I can’t explain that one,” Blyleven said.

    If a pitcher throws using a more sidearm motion, the ball will curve from left to right or right to left.

    Blyleven knew when to use it. Because it was so good, hitters looked for it. But some games, Blyleven would go innings without throwing it. Just the threat kept hitters guessing.

    Oh, and one more thing.

    “I didn’t start throwing it until I was 14 or 15,” Blyleven said. “You shouldn’t throw a curveball before then. A 12-year-old’s arm isn’t developed enough to throw it, and if you want to throw it, your arm has to be developed and you have to use the proper mechanics.”

    Maybe that’s why Blyleven went on the disabled list only twice even though he threw curve after curve through nearly 5,000 innings.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Thursday Night Football

Listen Live