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Who Do You Want To See On A Stamp?

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(credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

(credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

(credit: CBS) Edgar Linares
Edgar Linares moved to the Twin Cities 24 hours before the largest...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The U.S. Postal Service says beginning next year it will honor living individuals on stamps. It’s dropping a long-standing rule that only people who have been dead for more than five years are eligible to be on a stamp.

Now acclaimed musicians, sports stars, writers, artists and nationally-known figures can be honored on the tiny piece of paper. USPS is also using social media to take suggestions on the top five choices using Facebook and Twitter.

“This change will enable us to pay tribute to individuals for their achievements while they are still alive to enjoy and honor,” said Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe.

NewsRadio 830 WCCO’s Edgar Linares Reports

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Many in downtown Minneapolis had their opinion on who should be on a stamp. They range from comedian Don Rickles to Today Show broadcaster Willard Scott.

“Oprah!” was one woman’s recommendation. “I just think she’s such a fabulous role model and has just done so much with her life and she’s such and inspiration for women.”

One popular suggestion from people on the street is Pope Benedict XVI, even though he’s not an American.

“I think he’s a good man who’s done a lot for the world,” said Joann Johnson.

The Postal Service has been struggling with more people using electronic media. According to CNN Money, USPS is on track to lose $7 billion this year. While selling stamps with living Americans could bring in more revenue, some are skeptical.

“I never buy stamps, I don’t mail anything,” said Jason Lee on his way to work. “I guess I could get a lifetime supply of Don Rickles’ stamps.”

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