To Racy For A High School Yearbook Photo?

Check out this photo of a Denver high school gal.  She wanted this photo submitted as her sr. potrait.

Click here to see the photo


One Comment

  1. acorn says:

    It should be “TOO Racy”, not “To Racy”.

    1. Eddie R. Murrow says:

      Seriously…. this is the type of psuedo-journalism we get when:
      1) Journalists rush to put out sensational stories every few minutes like it is a d@mn conveyer belt, completely forgetting the BASICS of journalism
      2) when they rely on the red squiggly line that tells them they spelled something incorrectly.

      It’s ok when it’s a personal blog, but for a professional “news organization” this is UNFORGIVABLE – its not like the error was in a paragraph – it’s in your DA/\/\N HEADLINE for God’s sake!!

  2. gtV says:

    A high school yearbook once done is like a tattoo. Once , in this case, published it is a permanent record of who you were as a graduating high school senior. Fifty years from now is this how this young woman wants to be forever remembered? I think not.

    The yearbook editorial staff who made the decision not to publish this picture made the correct decision in keeping with their policies and guidelines for editorial yearbook content. The photo is a bit much for a yearbook picture. Is the photo representative of the rest of the students who attend this school or who want to be remembered as? What is this girl wanting to prove or say, for others to see or think, with this photo? A high school yearbook is not Maxim, Vogue, or [a mild] Playboy publication.

    If she submits another photo that is more in line with the yearbook’s publication standards and ethical guidelines then all means let it be published with the rest of her class’s photo gallery.

    For those who are screaming “freedom of expression” or “free speech” issues here, sorry folks, this is a high school yearbook with publication and ethical guidelines that it follows.

    It is her, Sidney Spies, choice to submit a photo that represents her future aspirations in acting or modeling when she graduates. However, the photo she submitted was not appropriate for the publication venue she chose to display this particular photo. Spies should be cognizant of this fact and adapt to a more appropriate view/photo of proclaiming her aspirations.

    As a former pro photographer who took hundreds of yearbook and senior photographs there is a more creative, representative, and acceptable way to portray a subject’s wishes, aspirations, or goals in a more refined, elegant, and tasteful way. Displaying a risqué, racy, and revealing senior yearbook portrait wasn’t the way to proceed for my clients. A modeling agency–yes; a high school yearbook–no.

  3. Eesh says:

    I have to agree. It’s a little inappropriate for a school year book photo. I’ll admit, it’s tastefully done..but it’s a bit too suggestive for the publication that features the photos of other children and minors.

    Parents look through this as a way to remember their children. There’s proper outlets for imagery such as this and the public education system is not one of them.

    It’s a nice photo..but should be used elsewhere.

  4. 2Racy says:

    Acorn, I was just about to post the same thing. Looks like the article was proofread by a high school student.

  5. rlw says:

    Yearbook photos should reflect the dress code of the school. I doubt the school allows students to wear a shawl only as a top.

  6. Too Racy! says:

    Definately looks more like a Playboy cover photo than a High shool yearbook one!

  7. Seriously? says:

    ‘We may get the ACLU involved’ seriously?! Schools have every right to set guidelines for their yearbook pictures. Mine did, my sister just graduated and so did hers. There are plenty of flattering pictures that can be taken that don’t require a girl to be half dressed. Fine for her to put it on her own Facebook page or website but it doesn’t belong in a yearbook.

  8. DMC says:

    what do you expect a strippers hs picture to look like? it is oh so obvious that she takes her education seriously.
    good work mom and dad. aren’t you so proud of your whooore?

  9. Commonsens says:

    I agree it’s really not a yearbook photo – everyone has the same guidelines to follow when it comes to pictures (granted most have commonsense) apparently this one did not – that or her and her parents are just looking for a quck buck in a lawsuit – which I hope to god they don’t get. They asked her to submit another picture and it’s just as bad if not worse – and we wonder why the kids of today are the way they are – just look at some of the parents.

  10. fitty says:

    The average size of the female negative poster:

    5’5″ 275 lbs.

  11. RegBird says:

    To the editor and author: it is Too Racy.

    Please understand the meaning of these words and apply them.

  12. digital food photography says:

    Normally I do not learn post on blogs, however I wish to say that this write-up very forced me to take a look at and do it! Your writing taste has been amazed me. Thanks, quite great post.

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