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Does The Mild Winter Mean Bad Lawns?

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(credit: CBS) Lauren Casey
Lauren Casey joined the WCCO-TV weather team in August 2011, a...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Our Minnesota snow has been a no-show this season. That has many worried about the condition of their lawns and gardens come spring.

Scott Endres, Co-Owner Tangletown Gardens tells us that “generally that big layer of snow that we typically get in a normal Minnesota winter is this wonderful, big insulation blanket.”

Endres says without this insulation, the soil is subject to large fluctuations in temperature. He says that on warm, sunny days, the sun will heat up the first layer of soil, getting those roots a little excited then clouds suddenly come in and create a drastic change in temperature, this really effects plant roots in a negative way.

The lack of snow plus an unusually dry fall will leave an impact, but don’t despair. Endres says grass is a hardy plant and will likely re-bound through the season, but that our perennials may not be so lucky, as he believes the main concern this year is the ornamental plants.

Though there may be a few more holes in your garden this spring, Endres suggests turning a negative into a positive by taking advantage of an opportunity to try out a new plant that you haven’t before, or an improved variety of that unfortunate loss that’s not coming back.

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