Green Sports Car On Display At TC Auto Show

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The 39th annual Twin Cities Auto Show is reeving up car enthusiasts.

One car on the show floor, the Lexus LFA, is lavish and fast and costs more than many homes – it retails just under $400,000. There are only 500 LFAs being made worldwide and only 172 will be made in the United States.

Bob Powell, a Lexus spokesperson, said the LFA is the company’s first super car and that it sounds like a Formula One car.

“The car is capable of 202 miles per hour,” he said. “It makes a wonderful sound.”

Powell said the LFA is 65 percent carbon fiber, making it light weight.

For those in the market for a car that’s eco-friendly and slightly less expensive – say $100,000 – the Fisker Karma sports car might be an option.

Gene Kaganovsky, a Fisker manager, said the Karma is the greenest car in the world.

“Our woods are pulled from the bottom of Lake Michigan and refurbished instead of going into a forest and chopping down trees to put into a car,” he said.

The Karma, as you might expect, doesn’t guzzle much gas.

“It’s a very unique, exotic sports car that can get up to 100 miles per gallon,” Kaganovsky said.

Interested in a car that’s easy on the bank account and gas pump, consider the 2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid.

Zack Nakos, a Ford spokesperson, said the Fusion Hybrid has excellent fuel economy.

“The Hybrid will have 47 city and 44 Highway miles per gallon,” he said.

The Auto Show runs through March 18. Tickets for adults are $10. For children 15-years-old and under, it’s $7. Get tickets online and save $2.

More from Amelia Santaniello
  • Mac the Knife

    Only problem with the Karma is that it doesn’t run.

  • John Frykman

    The only thing “green” about these cars is the boat loads of taxpayer dollars to fund them. You cannot consume $400,000 cars and make the claim that you are somehow helping the planet. But this is what happens when government picks winners and losers. The average family income of a Volt buyer (if you can find one) is over $140,000 a year. And the cost per car is well over $200,000. Who makes up the difference between the $40,000 selling price and the $200,000 cost? Not the wealthy “greenies” who are buying them. It’s the families driving around in 10 year old rust buckets because they can’t afford a Volt to become “green.”

  • Jason

    Tires make a pretty big eco impact, and how does pulling trees from the bottom of a lake help the ecosystem when in fact all they are doing is destroying another ecosystem that just happens to be underwater where we don’t spend the majority of our time.

    • dontwory22

      Indeed, consumers remain confused about what the Volt and other vehicles do for their high price tags – and the big auto companies haven’t done a great job explaining the virtues of the plug-in, which includes

      • John Frykman

        Indeed, they create jobs for Obama’s crony capitalist cohorts, like GM, and his big automobile union constituency. That is really what their purpose is.

        What are the majority of plug-ins fueled by? COAL! Silly, silly early 20th century idea, which was quickly replaced by gasoline powered vehicles which now gave people the mobility they needed to create jobs and a higher standard of living. The new electrics are not all that different from the original except for the price tags. They don’t travel much further on a charge than granny’s electric car around the turn of last century. If you really, really need an electric to make some irrelevant and pointless “statement,” wait 2 or three years. You should be able to pick up a used one for 25% of the price of a new one. No subsidies for used electric plug ins.

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