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Prominent Local Defense Attorney Dissects Senser Trial

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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The verdict is out on the Amy Senser trial, and many have been left wondering what Senser and her defense were thinking during the nearly 20-hour deliberation. But another Minneapolis defense attorney says he would have known they were heading for trouble long before.

“Anything after three hours, we’re in trouble,” attorney Earl Gray told Chad Hartman in an interview on WCCO Radio.

WCCO’s Hartman Interviews Gray

Gray, who was not involved in the case, says the deliberation came down to whether the jury believed Senser’s testimony that she did not know she hit someone or the circumstantial evidence saying she did.

The jury sided with the later.

On Thursday, Senser was found guilty of striking and killing Anousone Phanthavong on a Minneapolis freeway August 23. She was convicted of two counts of criminal vehicular homicide: failing to immediately call for help and for leaving the scene, and guilty of misdemeanor careless driving. The charges could lead to 4 years in prison.

Her attorney, Eric Nelson said Senser was “shocked” with the judgment.

Although Nelson said he decided he would put Senser on the stand months ago, Gray says he would have waited until the end of the trial.

“The story was difficult to believe,” he said. “Maybe she was telling the truth, if she were lying she might have told something more believable.”

So, what was the most interesting piece of the case?

“The media exposure,” Gray said. “It was hard to believe. I wouldn’t even classify her as a public figure. Why did this case get so much media exposure?”

The defense has said they would appeal the case, but Gray says there is no chance of appeal.

“It would be a much easier, defensible case if she would’ve stopped,” he said. “That’s why you’re wondering why she didn’t if she actually knew she hit somebody.”

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