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Consumer

New App Nevus Helps Keep Skin Healthy

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(credit: CBS) Natalie Nyhus
Natalie Nyhus joined the WCCO-TV team in January of 2011. She repor...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Your skin is the biggest organ in your body, and now there’s a new app that can help you keep it healthy.

The app presents a new way to track changes in your skin and be proactive about your skin care, and it was developed by a local dermatologist.

In 2004, Kim Weaver was diagnosed with malignant melanoma.

“I was scared to death,” she said. “I had just had my second daughter. She was only 3 months old.  It’s scary.  You don’t think at a young age that you would hear something like that.”

Ever since, she’s been diligently checking her skin for changes every couple of months. Now, with the release of a new app in April, Weaver has found renewed peace of mind.

“It’s called Nevus, which is the technical term for a mole. It’s a way for patients or anyone to watch their skin,” said dermatologist Dr. Malinee Saxena.

After years of practicing dermatology, Saxena saw the need for a skin tracking device. With some patients trying to watch as many as a thousand moles, she saw the challenge in staying on top of skin health. That’s why she created Nevus.

“With the rise of iPhone and Androids, you’ve got this amazing camera in your back pocket.  It’s a nice way to give people the access to do it themselves,” she said. “If something is changing, then go see your dermatologist and get it treated.”

The app tracks and reminds you when to check again. Saxena recommends checking your skin every three months to note any changes.

“I think it’s going to help me take care of patients better because they are going to be aware of truly what’s changing and what’s not changing,” said Saxena. “I think everyone should watch their skin as a requirement, just like brushing your teeth.”

It’s as easy as taking a photo of a skin abnormality or a mole.  Use that photo, choose where it is on the body.  From there you can log the size, name it and give it a description.

Nevus is not just for patients with a history of skin abnormalities.

“We’ve registered my kids, too. We will all be using it,” said Weaver.

The app also features a sunscreen alarm, a UV index reader, tips for skincare and what products to buy.

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