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Tips On How To Beat The Heat

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(credit: CBS) Natalie Nyhus
Natalie Nyhus joined the WCCO-TV team in January of 2011. She anchors...
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MINNEAPOLI S (WCCO) – It’s going to be a hot one out there today. Temperatures are expected to get into the mid-90s, and with humidity it will feel like more than 100 degrees at times.

Heat-related deaths are preventable, but every year many people succumb to extreme heat. With a high temperature in the 90s expected Wednesday, here’s some tips on how to beat the heat.

People suffer heat-related illness when their bodies can’t compensate and cool themselves. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But sometimes that isn’t enough, and very high body temperatures can damage the brain or other vital organs.

Here are some tips on keeping safe in hot temps according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

No. 1: Drink plenty of fluids, and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Increase your intake, regardless of activity level. During heavy exercise in a hot environment, drink two to four glasses or 16 to 32 ounces every hour.

Avoid liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar as these actually cause you to lose more fluid.

Staying out of heat is a good option. But what if people have no choice, like kids who have summer sporting events?

The CDC says to pace yourself. If exertion in the heat makes your heart pound and leaves you gasping for breath, stop. Also, schedule carefully as mornings and evenings are likely to be cooler.

What happens if you get too much heat? Here are signs of heat exhaustion: Heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headaches, nausea or vomiting and fainting.

If you experience heat exhaustion, rest, take a cool shower and get in an air-conditioned environment. If it’s severe, get medical assistance.

And don’t forget about your pets. Never leave animals unattended in vehicles. It’s best to leave them inside where it’s cool, if possible. Remember to give them lots of fresh, cool water, and have a place for them to get relief from the sun and heat.

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