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How To Beat The Heavy Summer Heat

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(credit: CBS) Lauren Casey
Lauren Casey joined the WCCO-TV weather team in August 2011, a...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – This summer’s extreme heat has caused a spike in the number of patients treated for heat illnesses at Regions Hospital in St. Paul.

The dog days of summer have been a bit more pant-worthy this season. In an average year, the Twin Cities sees 13 days with temperatures of 90 degrees or warmer. So far this year, there’s been 22.

Players with the Edina Youth Softball Association know that in order to beat their opponent, they must also prepare to beat the heat.

“We’ve been drinking a lot of water,” said player Emma Walgren. “And for the tournaments, we put wet towels on our necks, so that it cools you down.”

Whether you’re playing softball, running, or biking in the heat, it’s important to know your body’s limits. Dr. Gary Mayeux of Regions Hospital cautions that heat affects each person differently.

“It’s going to be different for every person, even people of the same age,” he said. “But especially the elderly and younger people, it’s really going to be different. So it’s really about knowing your own limitations, and how you’re feeling personally.”

And the best way to keep your cool in this summer heat is to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.

“Most people aren’t getting their eight cups a day as recommended anyway,” Mayeux said. “So you can start with that, and I’d recommend even more — somewhere between 12 and 14 cups a day.”

Mayeux says some symptoms of heat exhaustion include extreme thirst, nausea and vomiting.

If you experience hallucinations, this is a sign of heat stroke, and you should get to a hospital right away.

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