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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

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Eric Henderson Eric Henderson
Eric Henderson joined the WCCO.COM web team in June 2006 and currently...
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First off, you know you have to celebrate the arrival of Friday the 13th this week by checking out the Friday the 13th and Friday the 13th Part 2 double feature at the Parkway Theater on Friday the 13th. It’s not a suggestion, otherwise it would appear among the five screenings listed below. Rather, the double feature is a full-on requirement. (Also not listed below is this month’s Sound Unseen selection Good Ol’ Freda, owing to the fact that it’s already sold out.) Here are this week’s best bets around town that don’t involve watching Kevin Bacon’s neck impaled by an arrow:

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Monday, September 9: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Parkway Theater)

You’ve seen it. I’ve seen it. We both kinda liked it. Well, except for the part where Mickey Rooney is allowed to set back humanity approximately three centuries with his immensely regrettable yellow-face minstrel act as Holly Golightly’s ornery Asian upstairs neighbor I.Y. Yunioshi. That aside, the film remains one of Blake Edwards’ most effervescent entertainments, especially if you’re among the demographic that considers Audrey Hepburn the most winsomely attractive star there ever was. Never mind that it scrubs away almost all of the grit to be found in Truman Capote’s original novella. Think of the film as the diamond that was polished from the rough of Capote’s text.

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Monday, September 9 & Tuesday, September 10: Rewind This! (Trylon Microcinema)

If it weren’t for VHS, the world would’ve never spent so many hours debating over whether that blob in the background behind the Yellow Brick Road was actually a tragically love-struck munchkin that committed suicide right before the cameras rolled. If it weren’t for VHS, preteens would have never been able to rent Slumber Party Massacre for their own slumber parties. If it weren’t for VHS, no one would be nostalgic for bumpers like these. For everyone who came of age just as the act of watching movies at home became unshackled from TV and basic cable programmers, or for anyone who has only known the world post-DVD and wants to know why the advent of those blocky tapes was such a sea change, check out Rewind This!

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Monday, September 9 through Thursday, September 12: The Bling Ring (St. Anthony Main Theater)

Once again, the reviews for the latest film from Sofia Coppola … were not kind. But in case you want to buck conventional wisdom (and lord knows Coppola’s fans are known to do just that), St. Anthony Main is bringing back her epic for the selfies era. Judge for yourself.

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Thursday, September 12: “Bride of Trailer Trash” (Theaters at Mall of America)

Second verse, better than the first. That’s the promise for both this sequel to Theaters at Mall of America’s collection of, as I said last time around, “grimy-goofy previews for movies that time didn’t even bother to remember forgetting,” as well as the promise made from some of the trailers themselves. As it was before, the actual table of contents for this slate of detritus has not been revealed, but whatever you see being given the hard sell, know that the sizzle reel almost always trumps buying the whole store.

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Friday, September 13 through Sunday, September 15: Shadows & Faces (Trylon Microcinema)

John Cassavetes’ mission statement and the film that put his brand of cinema on the map, this weekend sees the Trylon hosting screenings of what many still regard to be Cassavetes’ finest works. Shadows is credited with laying the foundation for the entire independent American filmmaking movement (or, at the very least, broadening its viability beyond the realm of strictly experimental cinema). And Faces pulled no punches in its unforgivingly raw portraiture of dissatisfied middle-agers lashing out — and bottoming up — against their lot in life.

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