WCCO EYE4 LOGO WCCO Radio wcco-eye-white01, ww color white

Local

DNR Investigates Fish Kill In Suburban Lake

View Comments

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Today's Most Popular Video
  1. Full Interview: Jesse Ventura Talks After Trial
  2. 4 Things To Know For 7/30
  3. Remarkable Softball Player Gets A Look At His Dream Job
  4. Lake Calhoun Hosting Paddle For Humanity
  5. The Lowdown: 'N Sync Album & 'Sharknado 2'

SHOREVIEW, Minn. (AP/WCCO) — Minnesota officials on Monday were trying to determine what killed thousands of fish in Lake Owasso.

There’s no evidence of a chemical spill or toxins, and tests show that oxygen levels are normal, said Harland Hiemstra, a spokesman for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Lake Owasso lies within Shoreview and Roseville in the northern St. Paul suburbs. The lake is managed primarily for muskies, he said.

Lake resident Les Hassler said he’s counted thousands of dead fish since it froze over last Tuesday. Hundreds of fish could be seen belly-up inches beneath the new ice on Sunday.

About 90 percent of the dead fish DNR workers have counted are small panfish, with a few bass and walleyes, Hiemstra said. Residents have pulled out a few dead muskies and large walleyes, too.

“We’re not too alarmed by it,” Hiemstra said. “It’s part of a natural process.”

Hiemstra discounted speculation by some residents that herbicides used to kill aquatic weeds are to blame. He said the DNR doesn’t treat lakes for weeds, and while it issues permits for lakeshore property owners to do so in limited circumstances, the last treatments would have been in August.

Neighbors keep looking and wondering about the big bass, walleyes and muskies, above and below the surface.

“I’m sick to my stomach for the lake,” said John Newman, a board member with the Twin Cities chapter of Muskies Inc., which helped stock the lake. “I’m also real worried (because) this lake is connected through pipes to other lakes. So the best thing we can do right now is find out what caused this, and hopefully keep it from happening in any other lake.”

DNR Fisheries Manager Brad Parsons says there’s a fish survey scheduled for the spring, but he admits that we may never know the cause of the kill.

“In the absence of a, you know, real smoking gun, fish pathology can be a real tricky business,” Parsons said. “There just doesn’t seem to be anything that we can pinpoint it to.”

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus