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‘Ultimate Dinosaurs’ Invade The Science Museum

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(credit: CBS) Rachel Slavik
Rachel Slavik joined the WCCO team in October of 2010 and is thrill...
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ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — We’ve all learned about T-Rex, brontosaurus and even stegosaurus. But every day, researchers are looking for new species of dinosaurs.

Some of the most recent discoveries are on display at the Science Museum of Minnesota at the Ultimate Dinosaurs exhibit.

It’s an up-close look at history, and a chance to imagine life millions of years ago when dinosaurs roamed the earth, according to the Science Museum’s Kim Ramsden.

“These are some of the oldest dinosaur fossils ever found,” Ramsden said. “They’re 260 million years old.”

Ultimate Dinosaurs features twenty full-scale models. And while this may be a display of the past, the exhibit is all about the newest discoveries.

“What makes Ultimate Dinosaurs really special is these are dinosaurs you’ve probably never seen before because they’re from unusual places: Madagascar, South America, Antarctica even,” she said.

You’ve probably never heard of rapatisaurus, but it’s a name to remember because of its Minnesota connection.

“This one was found by Macalester professor Kristi Curry Rogers while she was a grad student, and was actually working in Science Museum,” Ramsden said.

Lessons learned from each exhibit are committed to memory with interactive elements. Kids get to feel the actual fossils, and touch-screen monitors bring the exhibit to life.

For instance, the touch screen explains that giganotasaurus was not only larger than T-Rex, but more menacing. It had teeth shaped like steak knives, which is a good tool for slicing off flesh.

Along the way, youngsters earn the certification of a junior paleontologist, inspiring a new generation to make the next big dinosaur discovery.

“Who knows, we still may find an even bigger dinosaur,” Ramsden said.

Tickets are $21 for adults and $12 for kids under 12. There’s discounted tickets if you become a member of the Science Museum.

The exhibit and museum are open special hours during March for spring break.

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