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Heather Brown

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Heather Brown loves to put her innate curiosity to work to answer your Good Questions on WCCO 4 News at 10.

She returned to WCCO in October of 2012 after two years of reporting at WNYW, a Fox affiliate in New York City. In the Big Apple, she primarily covered New York City public schools, but had the opportunity to report on breaking news, Hurricane Sandy and the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.

Heather had been at WCCO from 2006 through 2010. Some of her most memorable stories included the destructive forest fires in the Boundary Waters, the Republican National Convention in St. Paul and the 35W bridge collapse. She also reported for CBS News on the historic flooding in Fargo and tornadoes in western Minnesota.

Before her journey to Minnesota, Heather worked at WIS in Columbia, S.C. There, she covered the 2004 S.C. Democratic presidential primary, reported on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina from Biloxi and produced an award-winning education series that helped students get school supplies needed in many South Carolina classrooms.

Heather is a born-and-raised Philadelphia gal. She graduated with honors from Colgate University, so cold winters are nothing new! After college, Heather worked at CNBC in Los Angeles producing business news stories. She spent almost two years on the west coast before heading to Boston. In 2003, she earned a master’s degree in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

She’s proud of her Department of Natural Resources firefighting certification, participation in the Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program and nine marathons. (The 2010 Twin Cities race was her PR!)

There’s a good chance you’ll find Heather and her husband running the Chain of Lakes or hitting up fun restaurants around town. But, give her a good book in front a warm fireplace and she’ll disappear for hours.

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most recent stories2 Heather Brown

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Apples, Donations & Escalators

Becca from Sartell asked: Why do we give an apple to a teacher? Some believe the apple is a symbol is knowledge. But others suggest that back in the 1800s, frontier families were responsible for feeding teachers and apples happened to be plentiful. The tradition continues even after families no longer fed teachers.

04/04/2014

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Good Question: How Much Parental Leave Do We Take?

The Federal Family Medical Leave Act requires companies with more than 50 employees to give 12 weeks unpaid leave if an employee has been there for a year.

04/03/2014

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Good Question: How Common Is Welfare Fraud?

A Deephaven couple was in a Florida jail Wednesday night awaiting extradition back to Minnesota. Colin and Andrea Chisholm are accused of bilking the state out of $167,000, starting back in 2005. Prosecutors say they lived in a $1 million home and, at one point, owned $1 million yacht while they were receiving cash assistance, food support and medical assistance.

04/02/2014

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Good Question: How Common Is Snow In April?

Many of us woke up Tuesday morning wondering if Mother Nature was playing an April Fool’s joke on us. It snowed less than an inch in the Twin Cities on Tuesday, but several more inches are expected later this week.

04/01/2014

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Good Question: How Much Trash Is In The Oceans?

Searchers looking for Malaysia Air Flight 370 haven’t found any evidence of the plane yet, but they continue to get their hopes up when they see pieces of garbage and debris in the water. Yet, that can also add setbacks. Over the weekend, a promising lead turned out to be four orange cones. So, that had us wondering: how much trash is on our oceans?

03/31/2014

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Potholes, NCAA Ribbons & Flower Show Leftovers

Breanna from Anoka asked: Why are potholes called potholes? Taylor from Rosemount wanted to know: What do the red, white and blue ribbons on the floors of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament stand for?

03/28/2014

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Good Question: How Can Pro Sports Teams Set Age Limits?

New NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has brought up an age-old issue within the NBA. He wants to raise the minimum age, which is now 20 years old. Right now, a player must be at least 19 and one year removed from high school. He argues it would make for a more competitive draft and another year of player maturity.

03/27/2014

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Good Question: Is There A Healthy Way To Divorce?

Most of us would just call it separation or divorce, but Gywneth Paltrow calls it “conscious uncoupling.” On Tuesday, she and her husband, Chris Martin, announced they’re splitting up after more than a decade of marriage.

03/26/2014

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Good Question: How Do Metal Detectors Work?

Anyone who wants to go to a Twins home game this season will have to go through a metal detector. On Tuesday, the Twins announced they’ll have them at all entrances to Target Field by May 1. They are complying with a Major League Baseball rule that requires security screening at all ballparks by 2015.

03/25/2014

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Good Question: How Is Light Beer Made?

Over the next few days, there will be many people watching the NCAA tournament with a beer by their side. And when they do, there’s a good chance that beer will be light. According to Beer Marketers Insights, Bud Light was the top-selling beer in 2012, making up more than 18 percent of the entire beer market. Light beer was invented in the 1960s by a biochemist who believed many people didn’t like beer because they were afraid it would make them gain weight. Ultimately, that beer became the precursor to Miller Lite.

03/20/2014

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Good Question: What’s Happening To All Of That Metrodome Debris?

If the Metrodome’s demolition was like a Vikings football game, we’d be in the final few minutes of the last quarter. Anyone who has driven by the facility over the past few weeks has likely noticed the demolition is almost complete. “All we have left is to clear the site of the rubble,” said Michele Kelm-Helgen, Chair of the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority.

03/19/2014

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Edition

It’s been 10 days since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared. Since that time, it seems like most everyone has a theory about what happened to the Boeing 777 on its way from Kuala Lampur to Beijing. Many WCCO-TV viewers have sent in their Good Questions on everything from the logistics to how planes work to why people never made phone calls. So, we thought we’d answer some of the Good Questions we’ve heard throughout the week.

03/18/2014

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Good Question: How Often Is March ‘In Like A Lion, Out Like A Lamb’?

Is the old saying about March — “In like a lion, out like a lamb” — just a saying? Kathy from St. Cloud asked how often that really happens.

03/17/2014

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Presidential Husbands, Dry Eyes & Feminized Vehicles

I love answering questions from kids because they can really stump us with the simplest things. Nine-year-old Dominick from Mounds View wants to know: If the U.S. president was a woman, what would they call her husband? The short answer to this one is that no one knows yet for sure because it has yet to happen.

03/14/2014

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Good Question: Why Isn’t Seafood Considered Meat?

Each Friday during Lent, Catholics are supposed to give up meat, so many turn to fish. That had Chuck from Clearwater wanting to know: Why is fish not considered meat? According to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, abstinence laws say meat is considered something that comes only from animals that live on land, like chicken, cows, sheep or pigs.

03/13/2014

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