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Heather Brown

77674 heather brown web Heather Brown
Heather Brown loves to put her innate curiosity to work to answer your Good Questions on WCCO 4 News at 10.

She returned to WCCO in October of 2012 after two years of reporting at WNYW, a Fox affiliate in New York City. In the Big Apple, she primarily covered New York City public schools, but had the opportunity to report on breaking news, Hurricane Sandy and the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.

Heather had been at WCCO from 2006 through 2010. Some of her most memorable stories included the destructive forest fires in the Boundary Waters, the Republican National Convention in St. Paul and the 35W bridge collapse. She also reported for CBS News on the historic flooding in Fargo and tornadoes in western Minnesota.

Before her journey to Minnesota, Heather worked at WIS in Columbia, S.C. There, she covered the 2004 S.C. Democratic presidential primary, reported on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina from Biloxi and produced an award-winning education series that helped students get school supplies needed in many South Carolina classrooms.

Heather is a born-and-raised Philadelphia gal. She graduated with honors from Colgate University, so cold winters are nothing new! After college, Heather worked at CNBC in Los Angeles producing business news stories. She spent almost two years on the west coast before heading to Boston. In 2003, she earned a master’s degree in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

She’s proud of her Department of Natural Resources firefighting certification, participation in the Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program and nine marathons. (The 2010 Twin Cities race was her PR!)

There’s a good chance you’ll find Heather and her husband running the Chain of Lakes or hitting up fun restaurants around town. But, give her a good book in front a warm fireplace and she’ll disappear for hours.

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(credit: Daniel Shirey/Getty Images) (Byline: Daniel Shirey, Byline Title: Stringer, Credit: Getty Images)

Good Question: How Did So Little Snow In Ga. Cause Such A Big Mess?

After two inches of snow fell in parts of Georgia, Alabama and Louisiana on Tuesday, traffic in some places came to a standstill for 24 hours. Thousands of children had to spend the night at school and rescue crews brought food and water to stranded drivers.

01/29/2014

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Good Question: How Are Super Bowl Tickets Distributed?

The cheapest seats for this Sunday’s Super Bowl are going for $1,500 a piece. That’s down from nearly $2,500 last week due to fears of cold and rainy weather at the outdoor MetLife Stadium. According to Ticket King, the Minnesota-based ticket reseller, there are about 4,000 available tickets left on the secondary market for the 82,000-seat venue. Andrew Baydala, executive director of business operations for Ticket King, says a 50-yard line club seat ticket is now going for nearly $9,000 on the secondary market.

01/27/2014

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Good Question – Reply All: Sleeping Dogs, Fall Towns & Cold Records

Riley, the Heine family’s English setter, can sleep anywhere, anytime. So, that had Karen from Edina wanting to know: Why do dogs sleep so much? According to Dr. Travis with Uptown Veterinarians, dogs have natural circadian rhythms, like humans. He says some dogs sleep far more than others, and are influenced by their owners’ schedules.

01/24/2014

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Good Question: Will Recent School Closures Cut Into Summer Vacation?

In his twelve years as superintendent at Minnetonka Public Schools, Dr. Dennis Peterson has called off school three, maybe four times. Each time it was for snow, not cold.

01/23/2014

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Good Question: Are Bigger Headphones Better For You?

Throughout the day, many of us listen to music at the office, on the bus and on the street.

01/22/2014

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Good Question: How Is Food Tax Decided?

Right now, Papa Murphy’s is fighting a push to tax its take-and-bake pizza. The pizza is not considered “prepared” food, so it’s exempt. Looking at your grocery receipt to see what’s taxed often doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. So how is food tax decided? Heather Brown takes a close look at this Good Question.

01/21/2014

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Good Question: How Did MLK Jr.’s Birthday Become A Nat’l Holiday?

The third Monday of every January is one of ten national holidays that government employees get every year. Most children have no school and every state and federal employee receives a paid day off. The first official observation of Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a federal holiday was on January 20, 1986 – 18 years after the Civil Rights leader was shot. But David Chang, a professor of U.S. history at the University of Minnesota, says the idea for the holiday came just four days after the assassination in 1968.

01/20/2014

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Contagious People, Prongs & The Golden Dome Seat

Kathy from Roseville asked: How long is a person with the flu contagious? The Minnesota Department of Health follows the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control when it comes to influenza.

01/17/2014

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Good Question: Do Airline Mergers Hurt Or Help Us?

American Airlines plans to end its direct flights from MSP to New York’s LaGuardia and Washington’s Reagan National Airports. The changes are part of a deal with the Justice Department to push through American’s merger with U.S. Airways. American agreed to give up some of its airport slots to lower-cost airlines. So do airline mergers hurt us or help us? According to Myles Shaver, a professor business strategy at the Carlson School of Business, opinions are mixed.

01/16/2014

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Good Question: How Does Minnesota Rank In Recycling?

Minnesota is considering a new recycling program where you could return your drink containers for 10 cents a piece. On Tuesday, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency held a public hearing to release a report that argued our can and bottle recycling rate could rise from 45 percent to 84 percent with a 10-cent deposit fee. The report said a new program would add 1,000 jobs in the state, but costs beverage producers $29 million.So that had us wondering: How does Minnesota rank in recycling?

01/15/2014

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Good Question: What Does Minnesota’s Lieutenant Governor Do?

LT. Gov. Yvonne Prettner Solon announced on Tuesday she will not seek re-election with Gov. Mark Dayton this fall. The former DFL state senator and Duluth city councilwoman said she considered her work on health care and seniors most rewarding during her term, but that she had “expected to be more involved in some policy initiatives and I found ways to do that.”

01/14/2014

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Good Question: How Can We Keep Our Shoes Clean In Winter?

If you’ve made it through a Minnesota winter, then you’re familiar with those whitish-grey shoe stains from all that salt. From commuting shoes to just allowing the salt to take over, everyone has a coping strategy. Bob Fisher, owner of Bob’s Shoe Repair in Wayzata, says Winter is a great time for business. He’s been repairing shoes, or “saving souls” as he puts it, for 43 years.

01/13/2014

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Good Question ‘Reply All’: Gas Meters, 3-Alarm Fires & Hat Tricks

This one came to us without a name, but it’s from someone who wanted to know: How do they read our gas meters?

01/10/2014

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Good Question: Is The PC Dead?

From curved televisions to connected cars, this year’s Consumer Electronics Show has all the latest tech trends. But what you won’t find much about is the traditional personal computer. That prompted a blogger with the Washington Post to declare: “The PC is dead.”

01/09/2014

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Good Question: How Much Does Insurance Fraud Cost Us?

More than 100 former New York City workers – including police officers and firefighters – were charged Tuesday with defrauding the disability system. Some are accused of fishing or doing karate after saying they were too injured or too depressed to work. Prosecutors say the alleged scams cost the federal government about $400 million. Every year, Americans pay $1.1 trillion in private insurance premiums, but a big chunk of that money goes to pay out false insurance claims.

01/08/2014

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