Jonathon Sharp

jonathon sharp2 Jonathon SharpJonathon Sharp is a web producer and blogger at He started as a New Media intern at the station in 2010.

After he graduated from the University of St. Thomas, Jonathon joined the web team again as a web producer in February of 2011.

When he is not editing and/or writing articles, Jonathon writes for the Movie Blog.

Aside from cinema, Jonathon enjoys rock climbing, Dota and reading.

He also has a huge crush on Carl Sagan.

most recent stories2 Jonathon Sharp

(credit: History Films)

‘Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead’ Reviewed

After watching Doulgas Tirola’s Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead, which traces the development and decline of the National Lampoon comedy empire, it’s hard to imagine a satirical magazine quite like them existing today.



Director Todd Haynes Gets The Spotlight In Upcoming Walker Retrospective

The focus of the Walker Art Center’s next cinematic retrospective is the work of ground-breaking director Todd Haynes, whose films (such as “I’m Not There” and “Far From Heaven”) are known for being controversial, complex and genre-breaking.


(credit: Walker Art Center)

Year’s Best Ads Returning To The Walker This Holiday

A 29-year tradition continues at the Walker Art Center this holiday season, as the museum once again will host the British Arrows Awards, a celebration of the year’s most innovative, moving and humorous ads.



Twin Cities Film Fest Boasts More MN-Connections, Broader Line-Up

The sixth annual Twin Cities Film Festival is boasting a broader line-up this year, featuring more movies with Minnesota connections, more documentaries and more features from filmmakers around the world.


(credit: Samuel Goldwyn Films)

‘A Brilliant Young Mind’ Examines What It Means To Be Different, Gifted

Besides suffering from a particularly boring U.S. release title, the English film “A Brilliant Young Mind” tells a nuanced and tender story of a mathematically gifted teenager who struggles to relate to those who love him.


(credit: Cohen Media Group)

‘The New Girlfriend’ A Complex, Unforgettable Romantic Comedy

Writer/director François Ozon’s curiosity about sex, gender and relationships is again on display in “The New Girlfriend,” an unpredictable and surprisingly touching film about love and identity.


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Filmmaker Behind ‘The Cove’ Casts Much Bigger Net In ‘Racing Extinction’

In 2010, National Geographic photographer and filmmaker Louie Psihoyos won an Oscar for The Cove, a graphic and unforgettable exposé of dolphin hunting in Japan. In that film, Psihoyos and his team of activists sneaked into an area where dolphins are herded for harpoon slaughter and fixed hidden cameras. The bloody images captured in the process horrified Western audiences and showed that filmmaking concerned with activism and the environment doesn’t have to be preachy and boring clips of humpback whales. It can be thrilling.


(credit: Cohen Media Group)

French Legend Lafont A Pot-Dealing Grandma In ‘Paulette’

The legendary French actress Bernadette Lafont performs a massive change of character in Paulette, turning from a bitter old racist to a cuddly pot-dealing grandma.


(credit: Matthew Horwood/Getty Images)

Interview: Minnesota Artist Talks Being In Banksy’s ‘Dismaland’

Banksy, the British street artist renowned for his subversive works across the world, has created an art exhibition from the ruins of a dreary, abandoned amusement park in a seaside English town. He’s calling the project “Dismaland,” […]


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A Look At Crop Art After 50 Years At The Fair

A quick look at Linda Paulsen’s works in the crop art exhibit at the Minnesota State Fair is all it takes to see that she has a sharp eye for color, texture and detail.


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‘Phoenix’ Achieves Moments Of Brilliance, Explores Identity After The Holocaust

Perhaps the best thing about Phoenix, the latest film from German director Christian Petzold, is that the ending is perfect, absolutely perfect. Not only does it neatly wrap the post-WWII story together, it hits you with a punch of emotion so strong you’ll be teary-eyed and breathless as the credits roll in dead silence.


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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

The Internet Cat Video Festival has come and gone, and so has summer, it seems. The forecast this week looks like it’s straight out of October, so it’s probably a good time to catch a movie, or watch something new on Netflix.


(credit: Jimmy Chin)

From Mankato To The Heart Of The Universe

For a world-class photographer who’s skied down Mount Everest and climbed the some of the most daunting peaks on the planet, Jimmy Chin was surprisingly enthusiastic to talk to WCCO earlier this week.


(credit: Walker Art Center)

Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

It’s a busy week for movies here in the Twin Cities. We’ve got a massive festival for the internet’s beloved cats, two compelling documentaries hitting theaters, and a screening of a French New Wave classic.


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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

It’s August already. How is that even possible? Any day now, you’ll be seeing back-to-school shopping displays at Target and planning out a visit to the Great Minnesota Get-Together. Already that nostalgia for summer is welling up as the nights get increasingly cooler. Already I’m drinking beers on rooftops and patios wondering how many of these I’ll have before the leaves start falling and the sun goes down with the workday.


(credit: Samuel Goldwyn Films)

‘That Sugar Film’ Creator Wants You To Know Where Sugar Is Hiding

hat Sugar Film, a Supersize Me-style documentary out of Australia, uses a sort of cinematic super-sweetness to combat the pervasiveness of sugar in our modern food supply. Filmmaker Damon Gameau’s film is visually over-the-top, with talking head experts appearing on cereal boxes and all sorts of different food labels.


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This Week’s Best Bets: ‘Barbarella’ In Loring Park, Robin Williams’ Final Film

It’s the dog days of summer, and there’s a bunch of great cinema to experience in the Twin Cities.


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‘Tangerine’ More Than Just A Movie Made On iPhones

Much of the buzz around Tangerine stems from the fact it was shot entirely on iPhone 5s, equipped with special lenses. While it is indeed remarkable that a pocket-sized device could have produced such a […]


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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

Somehow, summer is halfway over. That being said, you should probably spend as much time as possible out enjoying the warm season on a lake or a patio.


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‘Cartel Land’ Is A Brave Look At The Drug War; J.Lo Adds Nothing To ‘Lila And Eve’

Questions about vigilantism are at the heart of Cartel Land, a gripping documentary on the people risking their lives taking a stand against Mexican drug cartels on both sides of the border. Directed by Matthew Heineman, whose camerawork is athletic and fearless, the movie unfolds like a blockbuster action flick, not unlike executive producer Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker or Zero Dark Thirty. The film starts in Mexico, in the dead of night, with masked men cooking meth, explaining that while the drugs might wreak havoc in America, it’s the only way for them to escape poverty. What choice do they have?


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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

If you’re looking to escape the heat and humidity this week, there’s probably no better way to do it than to watch Satyajit Ray’s gorgeously restored and undeniably epic Apu trilogy, which is playing over at the Lagoon Cinema. While it’s no doubt a commitment to see each film, the payoff is hug: It’s one of those works that’ll rekindle your belief in the power of cinema, or art in general. Seriously, it’s that good.


(credit: Janus Films)

The Apu Trilogy Is A Human Epic, ‘Love At First Fight’ A Tough Romance

The love story that unfolds in “Love At First Fight” defies easy categorization. It’s not a French romcom, it’s not a passionate kissing fest, and it isn’t a tearjerker either. It’s just a slow-burning romance of sorts, with well-placed laughs. Featuring a remarkable performance by up-coming actress Adèle Haenel, the film is irresistible as it is unpredictable, and it makes for almost perfect summer movie watching.


(credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

3 Reasons You’ll Be Seeing E-Sports More And More

If you looked at this headline and had no idea what esports are, here’s an explainer: Esports are video games played competitively, often at incredibly high stakes, before a massive, global audience.


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Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

With the holiday weekend come and gone, perhaps there’s a bit more free time in your schedule for movies. If that’s the case, you may want to check out the Walker Art Center’s Summer Nights/Cool Cinema series, which starts this week.


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Stunning & Enigmatic: ‘About Elly’ Reviewed

Emotionally explosive and wonderfully amorphous, “About Elly” is a 2009 film out of Iran getting its well-deserved release in the U.S. just now. Directed by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Asghar Farhadi (“A Separation”, “The Past”), the film is a naturalistic drama that could easily be described as a thriller. Its characters are believable and mysterious, and the film highlights, to Western eyes, the weight honor holds in cultures built around it.