Jonathon Sharp

jonathon sharp2 Jonathon SharpJonathon Sharp is a web producer and blogger at WCCO.com. He started as a New Media intern at the station in 2010.

After he graduated from the University of St. Thomas, Jonathon joined the web team again as a web producer in February of 2011.

When he is not editing and/or writing articles, Jonathon writes for the Movie Blog.

Aside from cinema, Jonathon enjoys rock climbing, Dota and reading.

He also has a huge crush on Carl Sagan.

most recent stories2 Jonathon Sharp

(credit: Walker Art Center)

This Week’s Best Bets: ‘Barbarella’ In Loring Park, Robin Williams’ Final Film

It’s the dog days of summer, and there’s a bunch of great cinema to experience in the Twin Cities.

10 hours ago

(credit: Magnolia Pictures)

‘Tangerine’ More Than Just A Movie Made On iPhones

Much of the buzz around Tangerine stems from the fact it was shot entirely on iPhone 5s, equipped with special lenses. While it is indeed remarkable that a pocket-sized device could have produced such a […]

07/24/2015

(credit: Magnolia Pictures)

Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

Somehow, summer is halfway over. That being said, you should probably spend as much time as possible out enjoying the warm season on a lake or a patio.

07/20/2015

(credit: A&E Films)

‘Cartel Land’ Is A Brave Look At The Drug War; J.Lo Adds Nothing To ‘Lila And Eve’

Questions about vigilantism are at the heart of Cartel Land, a gripping documentary on the people risking their lives taking a stand against Mexican drug cartels on both sides of the border. Directed by Matthew Heineman, whose camerawork is athletic and fearless, the movie unfolds like a blockbuster action flick, not unlike executive producer Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker or Zero Dark Thirty. The film starts in Mexico, in the dead of night, with masked men cooking meth, explaining that while the drugs might wreak havoc in America, it’s the only way for them to escape poverty. What choice do they have?

07/17/2015

(credit: Janus Films)

Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

If you’re looking to escape the heat and humidity this week, there’s probably no better way to do it than to watch Satyajit Ray’s gorgeously restored and undeniably epic Apu trilogy, which is playing over at the Lagoon Cinema. While it’s no doubt a commitment to see each film, the payoff is hug: It’s one of those works that’ll rekindle your belief in the power of cinema, or art in general. Seriously, it’s that good.

07/14/2015

(credit: Janus Films)

The Apu Trilogy Is A Human Epic, ‘Love At First Fight’ A Tough Romance

The love story that unfolds in “Love At First Fight” defies easy categorization. It’s not a French romcom, it’s not a passionate kissing fest, and it isn’t a tearjerker either. It’s just a slow-burning romance of sorts, with well-placed laughs. Featuring a remarkable performance by up-coming actress Adèle Haenel, the film is irresistible as it is unpredictable, and it makes for almost perfect summer movie watching.

07/10/2015

(credit: Walker Art Center)

Movie Blog: This Week’s Best Bets

With the holiday weekend come and gone, perhaps there’s a bit more free time in your schedule for movies. If that’s the case, you may want to check out the Walker Art Center’s Summer Nights/Cool Cinema series, which starts this week.

07/06/2015

(credit: Cinema Guild)

Stunning & Enigmatic: ‘About Elly’ Reviewed

Emotionally explosive and wonderfully amorphous, “About Elly” is a 2009 film out of Iran getting its well-deserved release in the U.S. just now. Directed by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Asghar Farhadi (“A Separation”, “The Past”), the film is a naturalistic drama that could easily be described as a thriller. Its characters are believable and mysterious, and the film highlights, to Western eyes, the weight honor holds in cultures built around it.

07/03/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis/St. Paul)

Pretty But Troubled: ‘Madame Bovary’ Reviewed

While the most recent adaptation of “Madame Bovary” is no doubt pretty, director Sophie Barthes’ take on the classic Flaubert novel doesn’t quite feel like anything more than a bookish period piece. The dialogue is too flowery, the performances are mixed at best, and the film appears to be addicted to swooning over its delicate piano soundtrack.

06/30/2015

(credit:  Magnolia Pictures)

Mesmerizing & Frustrating: ‘The Wolfpack’ Reviewed

The “Wolfpack” raises far more questions than it answers, and that’s both why the documentary is so compelling and, at the same time, somewhat frustrating.

06/25/2015

(credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures)

The Filmmaker Who Won Sundance Made The Movie For His Dad

When director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon started work on “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” the film that went on to conquer this year’s Sundance Film Festival, bagging both the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize, he didn’t think he’d put a dedication to his late father at the very beginning of the movie.

06/18/2015

(credit: Samuel Goldwyn Films)

‘Live From New York’, ‘The Farewell Party’ Reviewed

A history of “Saturday Night Live” that isn’t afraid to dive into the show’s issues of diversity and identity, “Live From New York” is a compelling and effectively moving portrait of a program than in 40 years has gone from being an avant-garde game-changer to an American institution.

06/12/2015

(credit: Magnolia Pictures)

The Great Ecstasy Of ‘Sunshine Superman’

Nearly a decade ago, first-time filmmaker Marah Strauch thought she was going to make a documentary about her uncle, a man who filmed himself and others jumping off cliffs and skyscrapers for fun.

05/27/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

‘Slow West’ & ‘100-Year-Old Man Who Jumped Out The Window’ Reviewed

One of the best films to screen at the latest Minneapolis-St. Paul International Film Festival, Slow West blends a Coen brothers-like sense of humor with Tarantino-smacking violence to create a frontier story that’s hard to pin down and also forget.

05/22/2015

(credit: Magnolia Pictures)

‘Iris’ Producer Talks About The Life Of 93-Year-Old Fashion Icon

The penultimate film of Albert Maysles is a loving and inquisitive look into the life of a now 93-year-old fashion icon.

05/18/2015

(credit: Debra Spinney)

Big Bird’s Biggest Fan Is A Kid From Minnesota

Growing up as a kid with special needs, Nick Bertsch didn’t get invited to birthday parties or sleepovers. Making friends was tough, yet that didn’t stop him from becoming a close friend to one of TV’s most iconic characters: Big Bird.

05/15/2015

(credit: Debra Spinney)

It Ain’t Easy Being Big Bird, New Film Shows

In 1964, Muppet master Jim Henson picked the young puppeteer Caroll Spinney to don an 8-foot-tall bird suit for an educational children’s show called “Sesame Street.” Forty-five years later and more than two decades since Henson’s death, Spinney is still the man inside that yellow-feathered puppet, recognized the world over as Big Bird.

05/12/2015

(credit:  Samuel Goldwyn Films)

Reviews In Brief: ‘Tangerines’, ‘Dior And I’ & ‘Girlhood’

A lot of power in a relatively small package, “Tangerines” is an anti-war chamber drama with the emotional thrust of a knife to the gut.

05/01/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

A Look At The Winning Films From MSPIFF 2015

After showing more than 200 films over the course of the past few weeks, the 34th annual Minneapolis-St. Paul International Film Festival has wrapped up, and the competition results are in.

04/29/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

Day 14 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘Antarctic Edge’ Reviewed

Science documentaries focusing on climate change in Antarctica, with gorgeous images of cerulean icebergs and throngs of wobbling penguins, are not exactly rare these days. Dena Seidel’s Antarctic Edge is the latest among them, and while it’s not as mesmerizing as last year’s Antarctica: A Year on Ice, it does champion an important group of people: the scientists spending huge chunks of their lives studying the frozen continent.

04/22/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

Day 12 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘Theeb’ Reviewed

The beauty of director Naji Abu Nowar’s Theeb lies in its seeming simplicity. On the surface, it looks like a boy’s coming-of-age adventure story. Yet, on a deeper level, the film surges with western themes […]

04/20/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

Day 10 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘Slow West’ Reviewed

Perhaps if one mixed the cinematic vision of the Coen brothers with the Rocky Mountain vistas and greasy leather hats of Red Dead Redemption, the result would be something like John Maclean’s incredibly stylish and […]

04/18/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

Day 7 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘The Mask You Live In’ Reviewed

Why is it that nearly all of America’s mass murders are men, when women have just as easy access to firearms? Why are boys more likely to be bullied? To have learning issues? To drop out of school? To commit suicide? Those are just a few of the questions posed by The Mask You Live In, the latest documentary on gender in America by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, whose last film, Miss Representation, explored how women are under-represented in positions of power.

04/15/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul)

Day 6 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘Finding Gastón’ Reviewed

Saying that a documentary about a world-renowned chef could make your mouth water isn’t really impressive. But if a film could make you a fan of a country, a people, a cuisine, that’s something more powerful. Julia Patricia Perez’s Finding Gaston introduces the audience to one of Peru’s greatest cultural ambassadors, Gaston Acurio. The man, who appears at length in the film, is a bastion for every pepper, sauce and recipe native to his homeland, and he goes to incredible lengths to fortify the small Latin American nation as a haven for culinary treasures.

04/14/2015

(credit: Film Society of Minneapolis-St. Paul)

Day 5 @ MSPIFF 2015: ‘Amour Fou’ Reviewed

Writer/director Jessica Hausner’s latest work is weirdly captivating. The visual style, with people standing stiff as paintings and stoic Weimaraner dogs seemingly everywhere, sets it apart from so many movies these days while simultaneously cementing the movie in the historical frame of German Romanticism.

04/13/2015

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