American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Why Don't More Minnesota Teens Use IUDs?Over the past three or four years, the medical community has reached a consensus about the best method for teenage girls to avoid unplanned pregnancies. Long-acting birth control devices -- IUDs and under-the-skin implants -- function for years without requiring any effort by women. Their effectivity rate, more than 99 percent, is surpassed only by sterility and celibacy. Teens who’ve used the devices prefer them to other contraceptives. And while the price of a single device is upward of $800, their long-term cost is among the lowest of any birth control method.
Good Question: How Does A Pill Get To Be Sold Over-The-Counter?Oral contraceptives are some of the most commonly taken prescription drugs in America -- at least 10 million American women take them.
Group: Birth Control Pills Should Be Available Without A PrescriptionThe American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says the health risks associated with oral contraceptives are low, and should be available without a prescription.
Thursday Night Football

Listen Live