Oil Trains

Big Cities Scramble To Be Prepared For An Oil Train DisasterThey rumble past schools, homes and businesses in dozens of cities around the country — 100-car trains loaded with crude oil from the Upper Midwest.
Senate Panel Gets Earful Over Oil Train ConcernsAfter a number of recent derailments, including spills and explosions, a panel headed by Minnesota Senator Al Franken convened in Minneapolis Wednesday to hear ideas for preventing and preparing for such disasters.
NTSB Releases Recommendations For Oil Train SafetyThe National Transportation Safety Board is out with some new recommendations to help prevent explosive oil train wrecks. They include retrofitting train cars with protective systems better able to withstand fire, and relief valves that can prevent pressure from building inside the tank cars.
MnDOT: More Than 300K Live Within Evacuation Limits On Oil Train RoutesA recent study by the Minnesota Department of Transportation said more than 300,000 Minnesotans live within evacuation limits of the route that oil-carrying trains take from North Dakota through Minnesota.
Low Oil Prices A Bonus For Minnesota Railroad RegulatorsLower gas prices have had an added bonus in Minnesota beyond fatter wallets: Train traffic is leveling off, giving regulators space to refocus on safety issues, a state railroad official told lawmakers Wednesday. "That's the good news. It gives us a little breathing space," Dave Christianson, a rail planner for the Minnesota Department of Transportation, told a state House committee.
Dozens Of Oil Trains Pass Through Minnesota WeeklyRailroad documents released by the state Department of Public Safety show about 50 trains carrying crude oil from North Dakota are passing through Minnesota each week.
Oil Transport Draws Cry For Disaster Training HelpTrains have traveled through this part of Minnesota for just under 150 years, and as the small town of Staples grew around their tracks, railroads were virtually the only source of jobs for decades. "Four hundred men used to work in these offices," Tom Kajer, 75, head of the Staples Historical Society, said as he walked on the fiberglass- and plaster-littered floors of the original depot's second story. "Now, zero do."