White-Nose Syndrome Continues To Spread In WisconsinThe state Department of Natural Resources says over-winter surveillance shows white-nose syndrome or the fungus that causes it is now present in 14 counties, up from eight after over-winter surveillance that ended in 2015.
Deadly White-Nose Syndrome Confirmed In MinnesotaOfficials have confirmed the presence of a disease that kills hibernating bats at a state park in northern Minnesota.
Long-Eared Bat Could Be EndangeredA disease infecting the northern long-eared bat could place it on the endangered species list. The disease, called white-nose syndrome, has impacted bats in a number of states. Rich Baker, endangered species coordinator with the Department of Natural Resources, says a large number have died off.
Minn. Bats Are Facing A Deadly Disease, And Here’s Why You Should CareA small-winged mammal not highly thought of by most people is under attack, as a deadly disease has already killed millions of them across the country.
DNR: Fungus Dangerous To Bats Confirmed At 2 MN State ParksA fungus that has been linked to bat colony decimation has been confirmed in two Minnesota State Parks, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The fungus is known to cause white-nose syndrome (WNS), which is a disease that is harmful and mostly fatal to hibernating bats, the DNR said. The fungus has reportedly decimated bat populations in eastern portions of the United States and Canada.
Deadly Disease Could Kill An Entire Bat ColonyThey don't have a reputation as the cutest and cuddliest animals, but bats really do more help than harm. In fact, a new study found bats save the agriculture industry more than $3 billion a year -- money that would otherwise be spent on pesticides.

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