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Biggest Dog Breeds

November 6, 2010 11:27 PM

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Neapolitan Mastiff, akc, dog breeds

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The biggest dog breeds are a group of animals that look more imposing than they really are.  While a Great Dane may look like trouble, it’s one of the most gentle and loving dogs you’ll find.

Here are some of the biggest dog breeds and what you can expect from each.

Irish Wolfhound

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Irish Wolfhounds

Irish Wolfhounds In Minnesota

The Irish Wolfhound is more like a small pony. One of the tallest breed of dog, they originally were fierce hunters but are now considered sweet-tempered, kind and thoughtful dogs. They also can reach 7 feet in height when standing on their back legs! Wolfhounds generally live a short life of 6-8 years and despite their size, are relatively inactive. Expect them to weigh between 100-150 pounds.

Great Dane

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Great Dane

Great Dane Rescue

The “Gentle Giant” of the dog world. Great Danes are an ancient breed, spotted as far back as 3000 B.C. on Egyptian drawings! The Great Dane needs plenty of exercise but indoors they are perfectly comfortable laying around. They grow so fast, it’s important to train them as puppies to be careful around children and visitors. Easily reaching 150-200 pounds, some Great Danes grow even larger!

English Mastiff

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English Mastiff

English Mastiffs In Minnesota

English Mastiff’s are one of the heaviest dog breeds, regularly passing 200 pounds. They are the ultimate guard dog and you don’t even need to train them to do it. Mastiff’s are natural defenders of their home and family although they very rarely do so with barking or attacking. In fact, they’re known to be extremely friendly and gentle around children. They are inclined to be very lazy at home but as always, do better with a good walk. This is one dog you’ll want on a leash!

Neapolitan Mastiff

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Neapolitan Mastiff

Neapolitan Mastiffs in the US

The Neapolitan Mastiff is one seriously massive and powerful dog. However, with it’s hanging, loose skin, it does have a bit of a droopy dog appearance. This is not a breed for everyone. Neapolitan Mastiff’s need a dominant owner who will take control. Another natural guard dog, they are protective of the home and need someone to control that. Expect quite a bit of heavy drooling from this big fellas! Another breed that can exceed 200 pounds.

Newfoundland

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Newfoundland

Newfoundlands in Minnesota

The Newfoundland is a sweet, gentle and patient dog. They are outstanding with families and with children. They can be slightly tough to train and although not the worst of the big breeds, they will drool a lot when drinking water. And with their heavy, double coat of fur, they drink a lot! Newfoundlands love cold weather and love water. Usually grow to be in the 150 pound range.

Saint Bernard

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Saint Bernard

Saint Bernard Rescue

Yes, the dog you see with a brandy barrel around it’s neck. And that’s not far from the truth. St. Bernard’s have actually saved thousands of lives as rescue dogs working in packs in the Alps. They are able to smell people under many feet of snow then keep them warm while going for help! Yes, they are very intelligent and easy to train. Expect a lot of drooling, wheezing and snoring from this dog that can reach 200 pounds on occasion!

Tibetan Mastiff

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Tibetan Mastiff

Tibetan Mastiffs in Minnesota

The Tibetan Mastiff is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. It has strong instincts to protect and can be stubborn if you don’t show the dog who’s boss. They are very intelligent and easy to train and housebreak. Like most of these big breeds, Tibetan Mastiff’s are very inactive indoors but do need regular exercise. With their thick coats of fur, they can handle very cold temps but heat is very difficult on them. Expect 150-200 pounds with some growing even larger!

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