ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A quarter of the Minnesota Legislature has submitted economic disclosure statements that offer the public few or no details about the source of their outside income.

The forms are intended to offer hints of potential conflicts of interest when legislators craft or vote on bills. All 201 legislators and key officials in the executive branch are required to periodically update their forms.

READ MORE: COVID In Minnesota: 5 More Deaths Reported, With Hospitalizations Still Trending Up

Minnesota Public Radio News analyzed the forms for a story Monday. It identified lawmakers who call themselves consultants but refuse to say who pays them. Same goes for attorneys who won’t divulge client lists, arguing their professional codes of conduct bar it.

READ MORE: Overnight Shooting Leaves 3 Hurt In St. Paul; 1 Injured Man Arrested As Suspected Shooter

Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board executive director Gary Goldsmith says the only way to get more details is to change the law. Some lawmakers say they’ll push for that in the session that begins Tuesday.

MORE NEWS: Eligible Minnesotans Can Now Submit Requests For $100 COVID Vaccine Reward: 'This Is The Time To Do It'

(© Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)