MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Supreme Court says a man convicted of a drug charge is not entitled to the Second Amendment right to bear arms.

Wednesday’s ruling comes in the case of Andrew Craig, who was found guilty of possessing a firearm while ineligible to have one. Prosecutors said Craig was ineligible because of a prior fifth-degree drug conviction.

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Craig appealed, saying Minnesota’s law barring felons from having firearms violated his Second Amendment rights.

The high court disagreed.

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The justices found that the Second Amendment gives law-abiding citizens the right to have a handgun in the home for self-defense, but that Craig’s drug conviction is a “crime of violence” by statute, and he is unprotected.

The justices say that, historically, the Second Amendment was meant to apply to the “virtuous.”

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