There’s a lot going on at the White Bear Lake Center for the Arts these days, both inside and out.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

The main exhibit inside is one that’s actually rooted in the outdoors: Gregg Rochester‘s Le Tour d’Art, which is touring various galleries and is on exhibit in White Bear Lake through Oct. 29.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

This exhibit is one man’s ode to the world of bicycles, not the least of which is demonstrated by the bike covered in maps, or the world bike.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

It’s also a tribute to the world that bikes operate in, whether a whimsical countryside, or a more abstract vision of the joys of biking.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

The other item of interest, now and later, is the recently installed Osilas Labyrinth.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

If you’re not familiar, labyrinths have been around for centuries and continue to grow in popularity, as numerous groups — medical, religious, mental health — are finding that they can promote well-being and health. The one in White Bear Lake was installed under the guidance of renowned labyrinth expert Lisa Gidlow Moriarty of Stillwater.

There are many different designs of labyrinths, but most revolve around a series of concentric circles that lead to the center. Following the path can be both relaxing and meditative. To aid those new to the idea, the Art Center has offered Experience the Labyrinth classes with Mary Silvaroli Daul, who uses them as part of her work as a life coach. The classes are free, and the next one is scheduled for Nov. 18.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

The White Bear labyrinth is divided into four grids, and each grid has a different type of gravel, from a soft, deep-sandy beach gravel to a crunchy white gravel that’s reminiscent of walking on icy snow. However you choose to interpret the different types of gravel and their position in the labyrinth is up to you — but studying them is a wonderful way to detach from the demanding outer world.

There are labyrinths all over Minnesota. To find those closest to you, visit the Labyrinth Locator.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

Just outside of the labyrinth is this pair of tiled chairs, a wonderful place to prepare to re-enter the world after visiting the labyrinth.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

What else is happening in our state? Be sure to check out the 10 p.m. Sunday night WCCO newscasts, where you can learn more in the weekly segment, Finding Minnesota.

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