MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Every Friday, Heather Brown looks at some of your Good Questions that didn’t get turned into a full segment. This week, she’s looking into the language of pilots, the shelf life of car seats, and the fate of all those pennies you’ve tossed into the Mall of America’s fountains.

Debbie from Siren asks: “Why do car seats expire?”

Car seat manufacturers say the seats last about six years. The date can generally be found on the seat. Experts say safety technology changes often, so older seats won’t have the same safety features as newer ones. The plastic in car seats can also become brittle over time and might not be strong enough to support a child.

Jim from Shorewood asks: “Why do pilots say ‘crosscheck’ and ‘all-call’?”

According to Delta Airlines, the flight attendants have to verify doors are in the armed mode before a plane pushes back from the gate. Each flight attendant is assigned to a door. They will check that door and “crosscheck” another door to make sure it’s been armed. “All-call” is a feature on the plane’s internal intercom that allows flight attendants to talk with each to report their doors are good to go.

Jaime from Mound wants to know: “What happens to the money at the Mall of America fountains?”

All of the money from the Mall’s two fountains goes to charity, and a different non-profit is chosen for each month. Each month brings in, on average, $2,000. Some of the charities from 2016 include Big Brothers Big Sisters, TimeOut Family Abuse Shelter and the Phyllis Wheatley Community Center. Nonprofits can apply for 2017 in May of 2016 through the Mall of America website.

Heather Brown

Comments (12)

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.