MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — These are the four stories you need to know about from Wednesday, Feb. 17. They include a shall we say difference of opinion between Apple and the FBI, and a surprising winner in the country’s most prestigious dog show.

Judge Orders Apple To Help FBI

Apple to help the FBI unlock a phone that belonged to one of the shooters in the San Bernardino terror attacks. Apple must disable a feature that wipes the phone’s data after 10 incorrect password attempts. That would let FBI experts try millions of password combinations without threatening the data. Apple’s CEO Tim Cook is planning to fight the order.

S.D. On Verge Of Signing Controversial Bathroom Bill Into Law

South Dakota could become the first state to ban transgender students from using restrooms of the gender they identify with. The state Senate passed the bill Tuesday, and now it goes to the governor’s desk. If it’s signed into law, public school students would have to use bathrooms that correspond to their birth-assigned gender, not the gender they identify with. The bill still allows transgender students to request “reasonable accommodation” from their schools. Supporters say it matches better with the federal law requiring equality among sexes in public education, but transgender students say their classmates don’t have an issue sharing bathrooms. Gov. Dennis Daugaard said he plans to listen to recorded testimony before making a decision.

More Americans Dismissing Hopes Of Retiring

More Americans are planning to work well past the traditional retirement age, and in some cases are dismissing the idea of retirement altogether. That’s according to a new study from the University of Michigan. Economists say health is often a reason why people retire earlier. But even if people work as long as they planned, a new report says many of them are heading into retirement on shaky financial footing.

‘CJ’ Wins Best In Show At Westminster

This year’s Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was a 3-year-old German shorthaired pointer named CJ. His breeder, owner and handler said CJ is an “old soul.” The show’s head judge says he singled out the dog because he was alert, bright and paying attention. The competition started with nearly 3,000 canines from 199 breeds. Only the seven top dogs made it to the finals.

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