By Jennifer Mayerle

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota could have more triple digit temperature days in the future, if we don’t curb greenhouse gas emissions. That’s according to a study by a research group called Climate Central.

If things continue as they are, in 2060: 15 days per year will be over 95 degrees. And, by 2100: 42 days.

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“We haven’t seen an increase in summertime high temperatures yet in Minnesota,” Department of Natural Resources climatologist Pete Boulay said.

Climatologists say that all could change decades from now, based on what the world is doing in the present.

“As you get more and more carbon dioxide in the air and other atmospheric warming gases over time as those increase, the effects will increase,” Boulay said.

While still a controversial political issue, Boulay says with every crank of the ignition, pull of the lawn mower and flip of the switch, people are contributing to the changes.

“If we consume energy, in order to make that energy we’re releasing atmospheric gases in the air, carbon dioxide and other gases too, that causes the global warming,” Boulay said.

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He says using solar energy can help, but everyday changes can make a difference too, like riding a bike or recycling.

“To make a new aluminum can from scratch from aluminum takes many times the energy it would from recycling one so that’s a very small way right there you can do it,” Boulay said.

Without an adjustment from people around the world, Boulay says hotter temperatures could be ahead.

“There will probably always be somewhat of a change no matter what we do but it’s up to us to decide how much of a change that’ll happen,” Boulay said.

Boulay said anyone who remembers the summer of ‘88 can relate to what can happen in the future.

That year there was a drought and there were 16 days of 95 or higher.

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According to NASA, July was the Earth’s hottest month on record.

Jennifer Mayerle