MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – A Somali-American police organization says it believes that “institutional prejudices” played a significant role in the conviction of ex-Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor.

The Somali American Police Association (SAPA) released a statement saying that the way the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office prosecuted the case against Noor “reveals that there were other motives at play other than serving justice.”

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On Tuesday, a jury of two women and 10 men found Noor guilty of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the 2017 shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, who had called 911 to report a possible sexual assault in the alley behind her south Minneapolis home. Because Damond was a dual citizen in the U.S. and Australia, the case gained international attention.

Noor, 33, testified that he and his partner heard a loud noise and that he fired his gun to “stop the threat” after seeing a woman outside the squad car raising her arm. Prosecutors raised doubts on whether there was a loud noise and argued that it was unreasonable for Noor to shoot Damond, who was unarmed and in her pajamas.

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Noor is the first police officer in Minnesota’s history to be convicted of murder for a killing that happened on-duty. Immediately after Tuesday’s verdict, activists said that this circumstance is due, at least in part, because Noor is black and Damond was white.

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As a result of this case, SAPA says it fears that there’ll be a devastating impact to police moral and the recruitment of minority officers across the country.

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“And while historically it has not been uncommon for minority officers to receive differential treatment, it is discouraging to see this treatment persist in 2019,” the group’s statement said, adding: “Never the less, SAPA will continue fulfilling its mission of building trust among communities, neighbors and police.