MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) says approximately 100 residents living near the Water Gremlin facility in White Bear Township will need their private wells tested for a potentially-harmful chemical.

According to the MDH, the chemical 1,4-dioxane was detected in the shallow groundwater on Water Gremlin’s property at concentrations greater than MDH’s water guidance value.

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MDH collected water samples from 11 private wells in late January and early February. Three for those 11 wells had low, but detectable levels of the chemical.

“The concentrations found were between 0.06 and 0.12 parts per billion (ppb), significantly less than the 1 ppb health-based drinking water guidance value,” MDH said.

MDH says Water Gremlin’s environmental consultant, Wenck, will be sending letters to around 100 residents in June. The letters are being sent to residents where the MDH and Minnesota Pollution Control Agency recommend sampling — if the wells are present and being used.

Related: WCCO’s Investigation Of Water Gremlin So Far

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The priority area is where 1,4-dioxane was detected, immediately south and west of Water Gremlin along Goose Lake Road.

Additional wells may need to be sampled after priority sampling is finished.

As for White Bear Township’s municipal wells, MDH collected samples of three wells in March 2020 and the chemical wasn’t detected.

MDH will be overseeing additional sampling of groundwater by Wenck, with the work expected to begin in summer and continue to the fall.

In related news, Water Gremlin released a chemical called TCE into the air for more than 15 years, prompting the White Bear Township community to act. And following a series of WCCO investigations, Minnesota became the first state in the country to ban the toxic chemical TCE.

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White Bear Township is not the only community impacted by TCE. WCCO highlighted cities like Fridley, St. Louis Park and Minneapolis, who have dealt with exposure for decades.