By David Schuman

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The PGA Tour is in Minnesota this week with the 3M Open teeing off Thursday.

No spectators will be on the course at TPC Twin Cities in Blaine because of the pandemic.

It’s a change from last year when more than 125,000 fans attended the nearly week-long event.

The tournament’s fundraising, however, is still taking place. The eight partner charities are M Health Fairview University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, Greater Twin Cities United Way, VEAP, Urban Ventures, Lake Street Council, YWCA of Minneapolis, YWCA of St. Paul and the Science Museum of Minnesota.

“It was quickly apparent that we were going to focus our charitable efforts on COVID-19 relief and organizations committed to rebuilding the Twin Cities,” said Mike Welch, the 3M Open tournament director.

John Wilgers, the president and CEO of Greater Twin Cities United Way, says it’s an honor to have the community-minded tournament choose them as a partner.

“We are really focused on people that are disproportionately impacted,” he said. “That tends to be people living in poverty and people of color.”

Read More: 3M Open To Support COVID-19 And Social Justice Initiatives This Year

United Way helps with housing, food stability and childcare for frontline workers.

VEAP has already seen the impact of the 3M Open’s charitable efforts.

Last month, tournament ambassador and Minnesota Vikings player Kyle Rudolph coordinated and helped load up more than 2,600 pounds of donations during a food drive.

“Life is not normal right now and things like golf tournaments can’t have spectators but at the same time organizations like 3M and the 3M Open are still doing a lot to bring attention to what people living in our area are facing,” said Joe McDonald, the CEO of VEAP.

To help from home, post a picture or video “tipping your cap” to essential workers with the hashtag #3MOpen, and $3 will be donated.

The tournament will announce Wednesday how much money will be going to the charities.

Last year, the 3M Open raised $1.5 million for three local nonprofits supporting kids and science.

David Schuman

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