MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — He’s known for his music, his acting and his philanthropic work.

Now, Percy “Master P” Miller is turning his attention to the next generation, and their concerns about race and inequality.

Miller sat down with players from Minnehaha Academy’s nationally-ranked basketball team for their take on how to close the divide. Then, WCCO’s Reg Chapman talked one on one with him about moving forward.

“It starts with the next generation,” Miller said.

He believes today’s young people are ready to tackle the issue of race and inequality in America.

The actor, rapper and philanthropist believes talking openly about fears and concerns when it comes to police community relations is a good place to start.

“I think that police are afraid of us, we afraid of the police. Hate, hate. Where the love at? So the only way we gonna beat this hate and injustice and inequality is with love,” Miller said.

He believes it’s this generation that will help remove the barriers that keep us from coming together as one nation.

“Every policeman is not bad, every citizen here is not bad, so let’s standup for the ones that are doing the right thing,” he said.

Miller says knocking down all these stereotypes is necessary to move forward, and building generational wealth will help re-shape community and make life better for all.

“To stop this injustice and the inequality, it’s got to start with ownership,” he said.

Miller hopes his new products — Uncle P’s Rice, Pancake Mix and Syrup — help move the community in that direction. He created them to combat the stereotypes connected to centuries-old products used by most in the Black community. Proceeds not only help him with his philanthropic work, but also helps others gets a leg up.

“Now we giving our people opportunities, we giving them jobs, we creating factories as African Americans,” Miller said.

He also has a message for Minnesota, a place he considers a second home. He believes will overcome the divide that exists.

“To be honest with you, this is shocking that this happened here because I’ve been telling people in Hollywood and everywhere, like, man, I can’t believe the way white people treat you here in Minnesota, it’s love,” Miller said. “I’ve never seen this, and to have the George Floyd thing happen here, you know, my message to Minnesota is don’t be fooled by this one incident. The love is real here. We have to appreciate the people that are good in the community.”

Reg Chapman

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