MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Losing a child to gun violence is a tragedy no one should have to experience. For the past nine years, Marsha Mayes has been fighting for justice for her three-year-old son Terrell, who was shot and killed the day after Christmas 2011.

Every December before the snow falls, Marsha Mayes manicures the memorial she set up outside the house where her son spent his last moments. It’s one of the few places she’s comfortable going since Terrell Mayes Jr. was taken from her. She says she can feel her son’s presence.

“On my insides I’m damaged, I’m broken everyday. It’s a battle to get up and not know that I’m getting up and my child is sitting in this urn and there is no explanation or anything,” said Marsha Mayes.

No one has been arrested or charged for what happened the day after Christmas in 2011. The sound of gunfire erupted outside Mayes’ home near 36th Avenue and Colfax Avenue North. Mayes’ three children were running up the stairs to the bath tub, the safe place they were told to go when they heard gunshots.

One bullet sailed through a wall, striking the three-year-old. Terrell never made it to that safe place.

“The best gift for all will be for you to turn yourself in and give him that Christmas gift,” said Mayes. She wants justice for her baby boy. Police say they believe he was not the intended target, but after nine years, Mayes says she needs his killer to come forward so both can move on and begin to heal.

“I want to get this over with. If I could I would go and do the time with you just so we both can be comfortable and put this behind us. It’s time to,” said Mayes.

A $60,000 reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the gunman. Mayes hopes, after nine years, the person responsible for taking her son’s life does the right thing and end this nightmare for her and for the community.

If you have any information that could lead investigators to the person responsible for Terrell Mayes Jr.’s deaths, police want to hear from you. You can call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

 

Reg Chapman