By Marielle Mohs

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — This week’s election in Minneapolis is already one for the history books. Early voting is at record levels, and many residents say they were drawn to vote over the future of the Minneapolis Police Department.

Question No. 2 on the ballot asks voters if they want to replace the department with a Department of Public Safety. Also on the ballot are questions on mayoral power and rent control.

Additionally, voters will be asked to vote for mayor, all 13 city council positions and all nine park board seats.

When WCCO-TV spoke with voters on Monday morning, all of these items were mentioned.

RELATED: If Minneapolis Voters Choose To Replace The Police Department, What Happens Next?

One man said he wanted to see police reform but still wanted to keep the Minneapolis Police Department intact. “You put the people in power that went to school for this stuff and you let them do their job,” he said.

Another man had strong feelings about the park board. “The last park board folks were just not doing a good job,” he said. “So, we’re looking forward to some new people on the board.”

Another resident said he was well aware that the election in Minneapolis is being watched across the nation. “I think what happens in cities reverberates throughout the entire country,” he said. “I know for a fact that people are watching what’s happening in Minneapolis.”

Voter Information

Those heading to vote Tuesday will need to go to their specific polling place. To figure that out, click here. All polling locations will open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.

For those who are voting absentee but haven’t mailed the ballot in, it’s too late to send it via mail. The ballot cannot be postmarked for election day. It will not count if it arrives after election day.

However, voters can drop off absentee ballots in person at Minneapolis Elections and Voter Services, located on 980 E. Hennepin Ave. The deadline to submit the absentee ballot is 3 p.m.

If voters with absentee ballots miss the 3 p.m. deadline, they can instead vote at their polling place.

Marielle Mohs