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Fargo, Moorhead Work To Stay Ahead Of Flooding

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(credit: CBS) Rachel Slavik
Rachel Slavik joined the WCCO team in October of 2010 and is thrill...
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By Rachel Slavik, WCCO-TV

FARGO, N.D. (WCCO) – Fargo and Moorhead are doing the best they can to stay ahead of the rising Red River. Fargo wrapped up its sandbagging effort Thursday afternoon, calling off the need for more volunteers.

But, homeowners in the rural areas are still asking for help.

When Kim Larson woke up this morning, she knew she had problems.

“We didn’t expect it to come up that quickly,” said Larson, who started sandbagging around her home Thursday.

Water from the Red River surrounded her home and was inching closer by the hour.

“The river has to go somewhere,” said Larson.

The Larsons had all the necessary supplies on hand — sand, bags, even pumps. They’re used to the flood flight. The home has been in the family for six generations.

“2009 was just as bad,” said Larson.

But, an unpredictable river will catch even the veteran flood fighter off guard.

“There’s a tie to it. I can’t walk away and I won’t, so we’ll fight it that’s OK,” said Larson.

Luckily, neighbors and volunteers answered the call for help, Thursday morning.

“I would have did it much earlier, that’s just me, I don’t have to fight it at my house,” said Rhonda Bormann, who volunteered to help sandbag the Larson’s home.

“Preparation isn’t that great. It happens, because you don’t know what’s going to happen,” said Tyler Laufenberg, a volunteer from West Fargo.

Volunteers found out that getting to the home took some effort, water had already washed out a large portion of the driveway.

Within just a few hours, volunteers were able to build up the sand barrier.  It seems 2011 will be a year that water won’t touch the home.

“I think we’ll be OK. We’ve got a lot of people who came out,” said Larson.

Leaving the property will be the tough part.

“We just have to do the best we can and go from there,” said Larson.

Localized flooding is affecting areas south of Fargo, as well.  Many county roads have been closed due to the rising river.

Fargo and Moorhead are doing the best they can to stay ahead of the rising Red River. Fargo wrapped up its sandbagging effort Thursday afternoon, calling off the need for more volunteers.

But, homeowners in the rural areas are still asking for help.

When Kim Larson woke up this morning, she knew she had problems.

“We didn’t expect it to come up that quickly,” said Larson, who started sandbagging around her home Thursday.

Water from the Red River surrounded her home and was inching closer by the hour.

“The river has to go somewhere,” said Larson.

The Larsons had all the necessary supplies on hand — sand, bags, even pumps. They’re used to the flood flight. The home has been in the family for six generations.

“2009 was just as bad,” said Larson.

But, an unpredictable river will catch even the veteran flood fighter off guard.

“There’s a tie to it. I can’t walk away and I won’t, so we’ll fight it that’s OK,” said Larson.

Luckily, neighbors and volunteers answered the call for help, Thursday morning.

“I would have did it much earlier, that’s just me, I don’t have to fight it at my house,” said Rhonda Bormann, who volunteered to help sandbag the Larson’s home.

“Preparation isn’t that great. It happens, because you don’t know what’s going to happen,” said Tyler Laufenberg, a volunteer from West Fargo.

Volunteers found out that getting to the home took some effort, water had already washed out a large portion of the driveway.

Within just a few hours, volunteers were able to build up the sand barrier. It seems 2011 will be a year that water won’t touch the home.

“I think we’ll be OK. We’ve got a lot of people who came out,” said Larson.

Leaving the property will be the tough part.

“We just have to do the best we can and go from there,” said Larson.

Localized flooding is affecting areas south of Fargo, as well. Many county roads have been closed due to the rising river.

To help with flooding concerns, the Cass County Sheriff’s Office is testing two new air boats, paid for with a federal grant.

In the past, Cass County relied on the Coast Guard for rescues and to patrol flood waters. Now, the boats allow the Sheriff’s office to get on the water more quickly.

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