DNR To Try To Kill Zebra Mussels With Pesticide

FRAZEE, Minn. (AP) — The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources plans to use a pesticide to try to kill zebra mussels recently found in a lake in Otter Tail County.

DNR biologists surveyed Rose Lake on Wednesday and discovered a small number of juvenile zebra mussels in a small area of the 1,200-acre lake.

The agency suspects the zebra mussels were recently transported to the lake on a boat lift. The mussels’ small size suggests they are not at reproductive stage yet.

DNR invasive species unit supervisor Luke Skinner says the early detection means it’s possible the agency may be able to kill the pests before they establish a reproducing population.

As early as next week, the DNR plans to apply copper sulfate, a chemical used to control snails that cause swimmer itch.

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  • Remember AGENT ORANGE

    Toxicological effectsCopper sulfate is an irritant.[22] The usual routes by which humans can receive toxic exposure to copper sulfate are through eye or skin contact, as well as by inhaling powders and dusts.[23] Skin contact may result in itching or eczema.[24] Eye contact with copper sulfate can cause conjunctivitis, inflammation of the eyelid lining, ulceration, and clouding of the cornea.[25]

    Upon acute oral exposure, copper sulfate turns to be only moderately toxic.[26] According to studies, the lowest dose of copper sulfate that had a toxic impact on humans is 11 mg/kg.[27] Because of its irritating effect on the gastrointestinal tract, vomiting is automatically triggered in case of the ingestion of copper sulfate. However, if copper sulfate is retained in the stomach, the symptoms can be severe. After 1–12 grams of copper sulfate are swallowed, such poisoning signs may occur as a metallic taste in the mouth, burning pain in the chest, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, discontinued urination, which leads to yellowing of the skin. In case of copper sulfate poisoning, injury to the brain, stomach, liver, or kidneys may also occur

    • ez

      Creepy! Remind me not to use that lake.

  • Bob Toborg

    Why is it that the DNR is willing to try a toxic chemical to kill zebra muscles,
    but they are unwilling to try an ULTRA LOW frequency radiowave device that has killed zebra muscles in a lab setting?

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