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Heat Advisory Kicks Off Hot Holiday Week

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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO/AP) — Your forecast today: hot. Your forecast tomorrow: still pretty hot. Your forecast for the remainder of the holiday week: potentially firecracker hot.

Temperatures could approach record levels on Monday, and a heat advisory has been issued for the area lasting from noon until 10 p.m. The entire southern half of the state as well as the western side are affected by the heat advisory.

The highs could reach the upper 90s, but with the humidity, it could feel closer to 100 to 105 degrees, according to WCCO meteorologist Matt Brickman.

“We’ve got tremendous tropical heat really ahead of us today,” said Brickman.

The heat wave extends to much of the country, as well, with well over a dozen states in the U.S. under heat advisories or excessive heat warnings, according to the National Weather Service.

The heat wave is expected to last until after the July 4th holiday, with daily high temperatures anywhere from 10 to 15 degrees above average for this time of year, Brickman said.

WEB EXTRA: Know More About Summer Heat

The humidity should drop a bit going into Tuesday, but Independence Day and immediately thereafter is expected to again be hot and humid, with the potential for some isolated storms.

The combination of heat and smoke from wildfires burning out west have also led to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency issuing an air pollution health advisory for the Twin Cities metro area from noon until midnight on Monday.

Officials say ozone levels could be dangerous, due to hot temperatures and southeasterly winds carrying wildfire smoke.

Ozone concentrations are expected to rise during Monday afternoon and early evening, then decrease overnight.

Elevated levels of ozone could be dangerous for sensitive groups, including people with respiratory conditions, the elderly, children or those exercising outdoors. Officials recommend that people postpone vigorous outdoor activities.

(TM and © Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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