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North Mpls. Neighbors Come Together For Gang Prevention

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(credit: CBS) Reg Chapman
Reg Chapman joined WCCO-TV in May of 2009. He came to WCCO fr...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — More gun violence in north Minneapolis has a group of concerned neighbors going door-to-door, advising parents to recognize signs that their kids could be criminals or involved in gangs.

On Sunday evening, a small gathering of family and friends held a vigil for 24-year-old Kalvin White, who was gunned down on the front porch of his home early Friday morning.

Now, a gathering of a faithful few believes the fight to end the violence begins at home — with parents.

“We are knocking on doors, we are saying, ‘listen, we have heard your cry, we felt your pain, we want to make a difference and we are starting today,’” said Harding Smith, pastor of Spiritual Church of God in Brooklyn Center.

Smith has teamed up with the stop the violence movement and the Charez Jones Foundation. He says a list of 10 questions developed by local activist Tyrone Terrell helps parents figure out if your kids are mixed in the wrong crowd.

“This is something every parent should have if you can find those tendencies in your kids and know what kind of life they are leading out there,” said Smith.

With each knock at the door, they are engaging parents and offer the tools to start a conversation at home with their kids.

“We see our kids with new shoes, with new jerseys, we don’t know how they are getting the money to get these things, but we just assume, we just turn a blind eye, and assume that it’s through honest means,” said Smith.

Brian Dumoulin and his stepson Jordan are part of the movement.

“I see miscellaneous small things missing from the house. I want to know what’s going on. I want to know what your activities are after such and such a time,” said Dumoulin.

Dumoulin has had this talk with his children and now he hopes he can help other parents have the same talk with their kids.

“Take it to heart and actually sit down with their child and say, ‘where are you getting this money? Where are you getting this flashy jewelry? Where did you get this cell phone? I know you don’t have a job,” said Dumoulin.

The list also asks things, like do your kids not want to go to school or church anymore And are they out late and not at an organized activity?

To see the list, click here.

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