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Wis. Gov. Walker Vs. Union: What’s Next?

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(credit: CBS) Reg Chapman
Reg Chapman joined WCCO-TV in May of 2009. He came to WCCO fr...
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ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) – He’s perhaps the most controversial governor in the country.

Wisconsin’s Gov. Scott Walker was in St. Paul Sunday night for a Midwest governor’s conference to promote foreign investment, and couldn’t hide from questions about a judge’s decision striking down his law that took away collective bargaining rights of unions.

For the second time, a circuit court judge has ruled the law unconstitutional.

“There is an activist judge in Dade County who sought to go beyond what the laws lays out, and what the constitution lays out in our state,” Walker said.

Walker says if this had not been litigated before, he would be concerned.

He knows labor unions will more than likely try to have the court’s decision take effect immediately, allowing them to return to the collective bargaining table with the state. But Walker is determined to not let that happen.

“The attorney general will be in at the beginning of this week, asking the court of jurisdiction, in this case the Dade County Circuit Court, to issue a stay,” Walker said. “And if need be, we will take our further action to seek out a stay.”

Walker says the Chicago teachers strike proves his legislation will move a state forward and stop strikes that hurt those who just want to be educated.

“We are able to hire based on merit, we’re able to pay based on performance,” Walker said. “That means we can put the best and the brightest in our classrooms and we can keep them there.”

Lawyers representing labor unions in Wisconsin say this fight will end up in front of the State’s Supreme Court.

They do believe it will take at least six months of intense paperwork to get it there.

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