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Hudson, Wis., Sends Truckload Of Help To OK Tornado Victims

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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Victims of the Oklahoma tornado are about to get help from several Wisconsin communities.

Hudson businessman Paul Rode plans to drive a moving truck filled with supplies to Moore, Okla.

Saturday, people from all over Wisconsin donated items for the tornado victims.

Eight hundred miles separate Hudson, Wis., from Moore. But on the busy streets of the riverfront town, the tornado-stricken city has never felt closer.

“It’s the Midwest spirit. It’s the Hudson spirit. It’s the St. Croix County spirit,” said Preston Green, who is helping organize the donation drive.

A rental moving truck filled with 13 tons of supplies will connect the two cities.

“It’s a simple thing to do, easy, and they need it,” said Jon Coty, who donated supplies.

The community brought in donations of all sizes. Some had just an arm full of items, others needed to unload an entire truck. They brought water, cleaning supplies, even coloring books and toys for tornado victims. No item was too small.

“I just want to give anything that can help them,” said Blaze Saltzman, who donated supplies.

“At least we can do something, physically, to help. We can’t get there, but we can bring stuff,” said Cheryl Slind, of Baldwin, Wis.

This isn’t the first time Hudson has helped after a natural disaster. When Hurricane Sandy hit last fall community members filled a similar truck in less than three hours. Donations had to be sent away because there wasn’t enough room in the truck.

“The truck can only hold so much. It would be nice to have a whole fleet of trucks, because, I’m sure we could fill about ten of them,” Green said.

In times of disaster, the natural reaction is to help and sometimes the smallest gestures can have the biggest impact.

“It’s just someone saying, we need to help,” Green said.

The donation drive ran from noon until 4 p.m., but the truck filled up before the deadline.

The truck will make the trip down to Oklahoma starting at 8 p.m. Saturday.

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