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Good Question: ‘Reply All': Sunshine, Lottery Claims & License Plates

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(credit: CBS) Heather Brown
Heather Brown loves to put her innate curiosity to work to answer yo...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – I don’t know about you, but I haven’t seen much sun these past few weeks, But Deeann Kraemer from Alexandria is a little more optimistic than me. She asked the following: Does partly cloudy or partly sunny give us more sunshine?

I had to take this one to WCCO meteorologist Lauren Casey.

“Partly cloudy is more sunshine and less clouds. Partly sunny is more clouds and less sunshine,” she said. “It would go sunny, mostly sunny, partly cloudy, partly sunny, mostly cloudy, cloudy.”

S. Belair from Minneapolis wanted to know: How long does a person have to claim the Powerball winnings?

Depends on the state. Here in Minnesota, it’s a year. In other states, it can be six months or 180 days.

Also, you have to show up in person to the lottery headquarters for your prize. By state law, the folks at the headquarters have to make your name and hometown public. If you want to stay anonymous, though, that’s allowed in five states, including North Dakota.

It is, however, public in Florida, though… so congratulations, Mrs. Mackenzie.

Mary Royer from Litchfield wanted to know: What should we do with old license plates?

Well, if you’re like most people, you should put them in a junk pile in your garage, but you can recycle the aluminum plates by taking them to a motor vehicle office.

In some states, you have to return them to the state, but in Minnesota there’s no requirement to return them or recycle them. The only rule is that you can’t put old plates on a different car.

In Minnesota, new license plates are required every seven years. That’s because they get weathered and the reflective surface wears off.

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