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Good Question: ‘Reply All’: Fore, Food Trucks & Strangers’ Staring

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77674_Heather Brown WEB Heather Brown
Heather Brown loves to put her innate curiosity to work to answer yo...
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Jeff from Burnsville wanted to know: Why do golfers yell “fore?”

According to the US Golf Association, the word fore is Scottish and is a shortened version of the word afore, which means looks out ahead. The USGA thinks it originated in the military as a warning to troops up ahead. Other golf historians, though, say back in the 1800s when golf balls were expensive, golfers used people called forecaddies to stand ahead and figure out where the ball might land. They later dropped the forecaddies, but the fore stuck.

Chad from Minneapolis asked: Who determines where the food trucks park every day?

The folks from Cupcake food truck parked along 9th and Marquette Friday afternoon helped out with this answer.

The food trucks must park at spot with a meter and pay for their time spent parked. Along Marquette and 2nd Street (one of the most common areas), no parking is allowed from 7 a.m – 9 a.m. Starting just before 9 a.m., the food trucks circle the block waiting for the street to open to parking. Trucks find the first spot available and later tweet out their location.

Hannah wanted to know: Can you feel someone staring at you?

The psychologists and biologists who study this kind of stuff say yes. They say we have a detection system in our brain that tells us if someone is looking at us. We notice that person’s head and body, especially if their head is turned in a strange way.

Some researchers conducted staring studies at night or with sunglasses, and they think we’re actually geared to thinking people are watching us because it helps us be aware of what’s going on and prepare for any kind of interaction.

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