WCCO EYE4 LOGO WCCO Radio wcco-eye-green01, ww color green

Local

Good Question: Can You Count On Social Security?

View Comments

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Today's Most Popular Video
  1. Excellent Educator: Valley View's Heather Young
  2. Finding Minnesota: The Feline Fun House
  3. A Pill To Treat Concussions Is On The Way
  4. 4 Things To Know For Sept. 19, 2014
  5. Professional Bull Rider, Minnesotan Chats About Velocity Tour

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – With the uncertainty of the stock market, it’s nice to have Social Security there for retirement.

But Social Security’s very own board of trustees said that unless changes are made, it could be depleted by the year 2033.

According to experts, for younger generations Social Security is basically like adding money to a savings account, watching it grow, and then one day – “poof” – nearly all your savings disappear.

The safety net intended for older Americans won’t completely go away, but the board said it will be a fraction of what it was unless it is reworked.

Nicole Middendorf is the CEO of Prosperwell Financial.

She said one of the problems is that the government will sometimes take money from Social Security to fund other programs.

“The government will say, ‘Oh let’s just pull money from Social Security, and put money into there,'” Middendorf said.

Another concern with social security is that according to the Congressional Research Service, by 2030 the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to increase by 77 percent.

“If you are in your 50s or 60s, something is going to be there for you for Social Security. But if you are in your 20s or 30s, generally I am not including Social Security in someone’s retirement planning projection,” Middendorf said.

That’s why Middendorf is advising her clients to build their own nest eggs by maxing out 401 K’s and investing in IRA’s.

And if a Social Security solution comes together before you retire, Middendorf said look at it as a bonus.

“You’ve got to look at it that if you are going to receive something from Social Security, it’s an extra benefit to you. It’s not something that’s given and is always going to be there,” Middendorf said.

So how do you fix social security?

One expert said letting us invest some of the money could help.

Another possible solution is to raise the full benefits retirement age to 69.

Both ideas have received support and resistance in Congress.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,860 other followers