SCOTUS To Consider MN Voting Place Ban On Political Attire

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has agreed to determine whether a Minnesota statute that prohibits wearing political apparel in polling places is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court said Monday it will take a case challenging the law. Several groups sued just before the 2010 election to try to ensure officials would not bar them from wearing tea party apparel to the polls, including buttons that read, “Please I.D. Me.” They referred to legislation that would have required voters to show identification at the polls.

Minnesota voters in 2012 rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have required voters to show photo identification before voting.

Lower courts upheld Minnesota’s law barring political apparel at voting places, saying it’s reasonable and applies equally to all political material regardless of viewpoint.

(© Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Comments

One Comment

  1. As long as people aren’t getting in the way of other people trying to vote, this law is highly unconstitutional. In some ways it can be viewed as a law that is intended to block people from voting.

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