BP Oil Spill: 1 Year Later

(credit: Scott Lloyd/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
Explosion at Offshore Drilling Rig Deepwater Horizon
A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21, 2010. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Scott Lloyd.
(credit: Scott Lloyd/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
(credit: Scott Lloyd/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
Eleven People Missing After Explosion At Offshore Drilling Rig
Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate.
(credit: Scott Lloyd/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
(credit: U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
In this handout image provided be the U.S. Coast Guard, fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico on April 21, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew.
(credit: U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
(credit: U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
In this handout image provided be the U.S. Coast Guard, fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico on April 21, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew.
(credit: U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)
(credit: Petty Officer 3rd Class Tom Atkeson)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
Assist vessels fire water cannons at the Deepwater Horizon in an attempt to control and extinguish a fire April 21, 2010, which has engulfed the mobile offshore drilling unit after an explosion April 20. Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters are responding to the incident. U.S. Coast Guard.
(credit: Petty Officer 3rd Class Tom Atkeson)
(credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Massive Oil Slick Reaches Louisiana Gulf Coast
Eric Melerine releases crabs back into the water after pulling the trap because of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on May 1, 2010 in Delacroix, Louisiana. As polluted waters approach the fishermen doesn't want to take chances with selling possibly contaminated crabs so he is pulling their traps and dumping the crabs. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day.
(credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Massive Oil Slick Reaches Louisiana Gulf Coast
Louisiana shrimp wait to be sold at Schaefer & Rusich Seafood on May 1, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Many local residents are ordering extra seafood to freeze as commercial and recreational fishing east of the Mississippi River has been closed, as well as five zones of Oysters due to the expanding oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico.
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
(credit: Justin E. Stumberg/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)
Massive Oil Slick Threatens U.S. Gulf Coast
Gathered concentrated oil burns during a controlled oil fire May 5, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Coast Guard oversaw the oil burn after the sinking and subsequent massive oil leak because of the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil platform off the coast of Louisiana.
(credit: Justin E. Stumberg/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
A shrimp boat in the water near the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000-5,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead.
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rigon April 28, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Birds at the Breton Island Sanctuary
Birds at the Breton Island sanctuary that is protected by oil boom barriers to stop the spread of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster, off the coast of Louisiana on April 30, 2010. A giant oil slick threatened economic and environmental devastation as it closed in on Louisiana's vulnerable coast, prompting the US government to declare a national disaster. Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency and called for urgent help to prevent fragile wetlands and vital fishing communities along the coast from pollution on a massive scale. The wind started to strengthen and blow the 600-square-mile (1,550-square-kilometer) slick directly onto the coast, where a rich variety of wildlife were at risk in the maze of marshes that amounts to 40 percent of the US wetlands.
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Birds at the Breton Island Sanctuary
Birds at the Breton Island sanctuary that is protected by oil boom barriers to stop the spread of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster, off the coast of Louisiana on April 30, 2010. A giant oil slick threatened economic and environmental devastation as it closed in on Louisiana's vulnerable coast, prompting the US government to declare a national disaster. Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency and called for urgent help to prevent fragile wetlands and vital fishing communities along the coast from pollution on a massive scale. The wind started to strengthen and blow the 600-square-mile (1,550-square-kilometer) slick directly onto the coast, where a rich variety of wildlife were at risk in the maze of marshes that amounts to 40 percent of the US wetlands.
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Oil Boom Barriers Expected To Stop The Spread Of Oil
Oil boom barriers that are expected to stop the spread of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster, lies washed up on the beach after heavy swells and winds hit the coast of Louisiana on April 30, 2010. A giant oil slick threatened economic and environmental devastation as it closed in on Louisiana's vulnerable coast, prompting the US government to declare a national disaster. Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency and called for urgent help to prevent fragile wetlands and vital fishing communities along the coast from pollution on a massive scale. The wind started to strengthen and blow the 600-square-mile (1,550-square-kilometer) slick directly onto the coast, where a rich variety of wildlife were at risk in the maze of marshes that amounts to 40 percent of the US wetlands.
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
(credit: Mark Ralston/Getty Images)
Birds at the Breton Island sanctuary
Birds at the Breton Island sanctuary that is protected by oil boom barriers to stop the spread of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster, off the coast of Louisiana on April 30, 2010. A giant oil slick threatened economic and environmental devastation as it closed in on Louisiana's vulnerable coast, prompting the US government to declare a national disaster. Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency and called for urgent help to prevent fragile wetlands and vital fishing communities along the coast from pollution on a massive scale. The wind started to strengthen and blow the 600-square-mile (1,550-square-kilometer) slick directly onto the coast, where a rich variety of wildlife were at risk in the maze of marshes that amounts to 40 percent of the US wetlands. AFP
(credit: Mark Ralston/Getty Images)
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
A boat works to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf.
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Coast Guard Attempts Burning Off Oil Leaking From Sunken Rig
Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf.
(credit: Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Oil Barriers Expected To Stop The Spread Of Oil
Oil boom barriers that are expected to stop the spread of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster, lies washed up on the beach after heavy swells and winds hit the coast of Louisiana on April 30, 2010. A giant oil slick threatened economic and environmental devastation as it closed in on Louisiana's vulnerable coast, prompting the US government to declare a national disaster. Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency and called for urgent help to prevent fragile wetlands and vital fishing communities along the coast from pollution on a massive scale. The wind started to strengthen and blow the 600-square-mile (1,550-square-kilometer) slick directly onto the coast, where a rich variety of wildlife were at risk in the maze of marshes that amounts to 40 percent of the US wetlands.
(credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill Approaches
A sand berm built to capture oil from the BP spill is seen at an oil cleanup site in Barataria Bay April 13, 2011 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Barataria Bay and its fragile wetlands was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill Approaches
The sun sets over wetlands in Barataria Bay April 13, 2011 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Barataria Bay and its fragile wetlands was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill Approaches
The sun sets as waves wash up from the Gulf of Mexico (L) onto the beach April 13, 2011 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. Oil from the BP oil spill washed up onto this beach, one of the hardest hit areas, in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. Residents report that oil still washes up onto the beach after storms. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill Approaches
Dusk falls over the beach as waves wash up from the Gulf of Mexico April 13, 2011 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. Oil from the BP oil spill washed up onto this beach, one of the hardest hit areas, in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. Residents report that oil still washes up onto the beach after storms. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill Approaches
A sand berm built to capture oil from the BP spill is seen in Barataria Bay April 13, 2011 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Barataria Bay and its fragile wetlands was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill
A sand berm built to capture oil from the BP spill is seen at an oil cleanup site in Barataria Bay April 13, 2011 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Barataria Bay and its fragile wetlands was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
One Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill
A dead sea turtle is seen laying on a beach as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the turtle died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at an estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Bottom Photo) WAVELAND, LA - APRIL 14: A dead sea turtle is seen washed onto shore April 14, 2011 in Waveland, Mississippi. Endangered sea turtles and dolphins are still dying in high numbers in Mississippi, which continues to be impacted by tar balls and weathered oil. There have been 67 reported sea turtle deaths in Mississippi through April 11 and many believe the BP spill is to blame. April 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
The Gulf Coast Commemorates One-Year Anniversary Of BP Oil Spill
Waves roll onto the beach at dawn on the one-year anniversary of the BP oil spill on April 20, 2011 in Orange Beach, Alabama. Orange Beach on the Gulf Coast was impacted by oil in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion which killed eleven crew members. 206 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the Gulf of Mexico until the BP well was finally sealed. April 20 marks the one-year anniversary of the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
(credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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