Senate Office Building

Senate Republicans Question Need To Move Into New Office BuildingJust weeks before the new Minnesota Senate Office Building is scheduled to open, some senators may not want to move in. The $90-million structure behind the State Capitol will be ready in January for all 67 senators to move into new offices, but not everyone is happy about it.
GOP Senators Might Stay In Old State Capitol QuartersThought the dust was starting to settle on the political feud over Minnesota's new Senate Office Building? Think again. Senate Minority Leader David Hann hinted last week that his members wouldn't automatically move to the new $90 million legislative building erected over GOP objections.
Partisan Divide To Remain In New, $90M Senate OfficeMinnesota's now-scattered 67 state senators are planning their move into offices under one roof for the first time anyone can recall. As the new, $90 million Senate Office Building nears completion, an office draft is underway.
New Squabble Looms Over Minnesota Political Office SpaceAnother squabble is shaping up over offices for Minnesota politicians. The 83-year-old State Office Building that is the main workspace for 134 House members and their staffs is in need of more than $100 million in repairs, according to the agency that manages government properties.
Senate OKs Budget Bill With Money For New Office BuildingThe Senate has passed a budget bill that funds state government and starts making payments on a new office building for state senators.
Office Space Disputes Threaten Capitol RenovationMinnesota lawmakers are caught in a dust-up over office space at the State Capitol, and it's threatening to delay the massive Capitol restoration now underway. The three-year, $272 million project is on time and on budget. But the tenants in the new building -- including the governor, the Senate, the House and the attorney general -- cannot come to agreement over how much space they will control.
Dayton Says He Will Be ‘Unbound’ In 2nd TermMinnesota voters gave Gov. Dayton a solid re-election victory. But unlike the last two years of Democratic dominance, Dayton's fresh reality is a new Republican majority in the Minnesota House. "I'm proud to say that Democrats' total control of state government in Minnesota is over," said Rep. Kurt Daudt, the House minority leader. Exuberant Republicans will take back the House they lost just two years ago. That's when they battled Gov. Dayton to a budget standoff, and a 17-day government shutdown -- the longest in U.S. history.
Johnson: Senate Office Building An Example Of 'Dayton Administration'A leading Republican candidate for governor says he would try to stop construction of a controversial Senate office building project near the Capitol if elected.
State Sells Bonds For New Senate Office Building The state of Minnesota says it has sold $85.4 million in bonds to pay for a new Senate office building. Minnesota Management and Budget announced the bond sale Tuesday. State officials said earlier they would start on the four-story building near the Capitol within a few days of the sale.
Senate Office Building, Target Of GOP, Moves AheadMinnesota finance officials plan to sell $85.3 million in bonds next week to pay for construction of a Senate office building that has become a political flash point. The Department of Minnesota Management and Budget advertised the sale Tuesday and said it would be tentatively held on Aug. 5.
Court: State Office Project Foe Must Cover LossesA former lawmaker suing to stop a new Senate office building must come up with an $11 million bond if he wants to press his case forward in the Court of Appeals. A three-judge panel ruled Tuesday that the bond would protect the state from losses resulting from delays due to the litigation by former Rep. Jim Knoblach of St. Cloud. The state had asked for a higher bond while Knoblach's attorney has said it could deter him from pressing the case.
Most Of 2014 Session Is Already Behind LawmakersLawmakers will be less than a month from the mandatory session finish line when they return to the Capitol after Easter, but don't be surprised if they make an earlier break for it. Much of the heavy lifting of the election-year session is done. Negotiators from the House, Senate and Gov. Mark Dayton's administration forecast more ease than usual buttoning up remaining tax and budget bills.
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