MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The city of Minneapolis is rolling out organics recycling for those interested in the option.

That means residents will be able to toss things like food scraps, chop sticks and pizza boxes into new, green-colored carts. What goes in those carts will be picked up on the same day as garbage, and some of the things that can be recycled in them can’t be put in outdoor compost bins.

Residents must opt-in for the service, and they can sign up now.

Request a green cart by emailing swrcustomer@minneapolismn.gov or by calling 612-673-2917.

When Will The City Start Recycling Organics?

The city says that by August the service will available to 25 percent of customers and to all customers by spring of 2016.

Residents can start cycling organics as soon as they get the green cart.

What Goes Into The Cart?

All food scraps.

That includes fruits, vegetables, bones, meat, dairy products, bread, pasta, nut shells, egg shells, coffee grounds, and tea bags.

Organics recycling also takes care of food-soiled paper, like wax paper or pizza boxes.

However, paper lined with plastic can’t be recycled.

Other organics that can be recycled are chop sticks, dryer lint, human hair, compostable plastic, and houseplant trimmings.

What Doesn’t Go In The Green Cart?

Anything that can be processed through regular recycling should go in the normal blue cart.

Other things that shouldn’t be put in the green cart are milk cartons, liquids, oils, greases, and fats.

Yard waste is also a no-no. That includes branches, leaves and grass clippings.

Will Recycling Organics Make My House Smell?

No, the city says.

Recycling organics just means putting foods scraps and so on in a separate container. No new material is introduced to the household. It’s just taking what’s already there, sorting it differently and turning it into a resource.

The city recommends keeping a container for organics near the kitchen.

The organics will need be to be put in a compostable bag before they are put in the green cart. That way the carts will stay relatively clean and avoid freezing in the winter.

For more information on the organics recycling plan, click here.

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